Doom’s lead programmer recalls working with Steve Jobs

By

Doom cover
John Carmack was one of the brains behind some of the biggest PC games of the 1980s and 90s.
Photo: Id Software

Id Software co-founder John Carmack was behind some of the most iconic computer game of the 1980s and 90s. This week, the legendary coder behind the smash hit games Wolfenstein 3D, Doom, and Quake shared some memories of working with Steve Jobs.

Writing on Facebook, Carmack described some of his interactions with Jobs over the years — for better and for worse.

Today in Apple history: Computer retail giant closure hits NeXT hard

By

NeXT Cube
The NeXT Computer was great. It also didn't sell.
Photo: Rama & Musée Bolo/Wikipedia CC

May 14: Today in Apple history: Businessland closes, hits NeXt hard May 14, 1992: Steve Jobs’ company NeXT runs into trouble as it loses a crucial deal with Businessland after the giant computer retailer closes its stores.

It comes at a time when NeXT’s luck is going from bad to worse. This is one of the lowest points in Jobs’ career — before everything starts to turn around again.

Unseen Steve Jobs interview shares business secrets

By

Jobs
Who wouldn't want Steve as their instructor?
Photo: Deliberate Think

Who wouldn’t have wanted Steve Jobs to have visited their university class for a casual Q&A with the students? That’s what folks at MIT were lucky enough to experience in 1992.

Running NeXT at the time, Jobs stopped by to drop some wisdom on everything from his thoughts on leaving Apple to the state of computing to his thoughts on the right way to run a company. Excerpts from the discussion recently landed on YouTube. Check them out below.

Former Apple exec tapped to lead Computer History Museum

By

Dan’l Lewin in NeXT’s Palo Alto, California, offices, 1986–1987.
Dan’l Lewin in NeXT’s Palo Alto, California, offices, 1986–1987.
Photo: Doug Menuez

The Computer History Museum named former Apple executive Dan’l Lewin as its new CEO and President today.

Lewin was one of Steve Jobs’ top guys back in the early days of Apple. He served in a number of marketing roles from 1981 to 1985 and was recruited by Jobs to join his new company, NeXT, after Jobs was fired from Apple.

Today in Apple history: Steve Jobs’ NeXT quits making computers

By

NeXT Cube
The NeXT Computer was great. It also didn't sell.
Photo: Rama & Musée Bolo/Wikipedia CC

February 9: Today in Apple history: Steve Jobs' NeXT quits making computers February 9, 1993: NeXT Computers, the company Steve Jobs founded after being pushed out of Apple, quits making computers. The company changes its name to NeXT Software and focuses its efforts entirely on producing code for other platforms.

In a mass layoff, 330 of NeXT’s 500 employees are made redundant in an event known internally as “Black Tuesday.” Cruelly, many people hear of their fate only after it is reported on the radio.

Today in Apple history: Apple brings back Steve Jobs with NeXT buyout

By

Steve Jobs returned to Apple on December 20, 1996.
Steve Jobs pictured on December 20, 1996.
Photo: Tim Holmes/Flickr CC

December 20: Today in Apple history: Apple brings back Steve Jobs with NeXT buyout December 20, 1996: Apple Computer buys NeXT, the computer company Steve Jobs founded after leaving Cupertino a decade earlier.

The deal costs Apple $429 million. It’s a massive price to pay for the failing NeXT, which already saw its hardware division crash and burn. The price is worth it when you consider what Apple gets as part of the deal, however: the return of Steve Jobs.

Today in Apple history: The seeds of OS X are sown

By

nextstep
Look familiar?
Photo: The Color Convergence

Nov25November 25, 1996: Garrett L. Rice, a midlevel manager at NeXT, contacts Cupertino about the possibility of Apple licensing NeXT’s OpenStep operating system.

Rice’s communication with Ellen Hancock, Apple’s chief technology officer, is the first formal step in a long process. It ultimately leads to Apple buying NeXT, the creation of OS X, and Steve Jobs returning home to the company he co-founded.

Today in Apple history: World prepares for the NeXT Computer

By

People couldn't wait to discover Steve Jobs' next move at NeXT Computer.
People couldn't wait to discover Steve Jobs' next move.
Image: Newsweek

October 24 Today in Apple history October 24, 1988: Three years after leaving Apple, Steve Jobs prepares to launch the NeXT Computer, a machine he hopes will cement his reputation as a tech genius and blow away the computers produced by his former company.

The new computer receives a wave of positive publicity. Fawning stories show exactly what the 33-year-old Jobs has been working on — and what’s coming next.

Rare Steve Jobs-signed magazine goes up for auction next month

By

Steve_Jobs_2007
Who wouldn't want their very own Steve Jobs autograph?
Photo: Ben Stanfield/Flickr CC

Do you fancy getting your hands on some Steve Jobs memorabilia, but can’t quite stretch to the high six figure dollar mark needed to purchase a big ticket item like an original Apple-1 computer? No problem if so — because an upcoming auction for a Steve Jobs autograph may be more in your ballpark.

The autography in question is on the front cover of a Newsweek magazine from October 24, 1988, features Jobs with his NeXT computer — the first of several computers he launched during his wilderness years outside of Apple.

Today in Apple history: NeXT customers get early taste of OS X

By

NeXTstep
NeXTSTEP was an operating system ahead of its time.
Photo: NeXTSTEP

September 18 Today in Apple historySeptember 18, 1989: Steve Jobs’ company NeXT Inc. ships version 1.0 of NeXTSTEP, its object-oriented, multitasking operating system.

Incredibly advanced for its time, NeXTSTEP is described by The New York Times as “Macintosh on steroids.” In an ironic twist, the operating system Jobs plans to use to compete with Cupertino turns out to be one of the things that saves Apple a decade later.