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Lucy’s New Year’s Eve party bombs in trailer for new Peanuts special

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Lucy’s New Year’s Eve party bombs in trailer for new Peanuts special
Lucy takes center stage in Snoopy Presents: For Auld Lang Syne on Apple TV+.
Photo: WildBrain/Apple TV+

For Auld Lang Syne will be the first new Peanuts holiday special since 2002, and a trailer released Monday gives a preview. Lucy puts on a New Year’s Eve party but must deal with nothing going right.

The special, set to start streaming in December, looks like a turnaround for Lucy, whose arrogance, bossiness and cruelty generally gets her cast as the villain.

App Store shatters revenue record on New Year’s Day

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New Year's apps
It’s still
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

2018 is already starting to look like a historic year for Apple after the company just broke the record for the most revenue pulled in by the App Store in a single day.

Apple revealed today that iPhone and iPad customers spent an astounding $300 million in the App Store on New Year’s day, shattering the previous record of $240 million.

Fist-fighting, funky underwear, and 8 more bizarre NYE celebrations

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We've all got our annual New Year's traditions for the change of the calendar year. Some of us watch the ball drop in Times Square, while others stay up all night drinking, hoping we wake up somewhere recognizable on New Year's Day.

There are a ton of different traditions around the world, each intent on getting a head start on a prosperous and positive new start on life. Here are ten of the oddest (to us) from around the globe.
< br />Photo: Nana B Agyei/Flickr CC
In Romania, some folks dress up in bear furs or costumes and walk the streets to ward off evil. That's surely one way to keep things from going wrong next year.

Photo: Carlos Carmonamedina/Flickr CC
If you're Danish, you might hurl your old plates at the doorways of friends and family, or neighbor's you want to have good luck in the coming year. Plus? You get to buy new plates!

Photo: noricum/Flickr CC
If you want to bring about specific kinds of good fortune in the coming year, you'll wear different color undies in some South American countries. Red means you're in the mood for love.

Photo: Esquire
Seriously, I think the French have it right: eat some sweet carb-loaded food and call it good. Pancakes are a traditional New Year's treat.

Photo: rob_rob2001/Flickr CC
Dr. Doolittle has nothing on farmers in Belgium who wish their livestock a happy New Year in the hopes that they'll be healthy and productive in the coming months. If they talk back (in Romania and Hungary), that's supposed to be bad luck. Or you've been drinking too much.

Photo: Rachel Kramer/Flickr CC
Can you stuff 12 grapes in your mouth? If so, you just might have a good year, according to folks in Spain. If not, well, good luck.

Photo: Mohamad Khedr/Flickr CC
The Italians might have those French pancake-eaters beat with a tradition of public kissing in places like St Mark's square in Venice.

Photo: llee_wu/Flickr CC
One tradition in the tiny village of Takanakuy, Peru lets people with conflicts settle them Fight Club style and then start the year with a fresh slate. No resentments!

Photo: Daniel Parra
If you're in Siberia, chances are there are plenty of spots along the coast where you can go ice diving to plant trees under the frozen waters. You won't catch us doing this in Alaska, I'll tell you that.

Photo: Telegraph
Celebrations in Denmark include jumping off of chairs into the New Year, kids in the Phillippines jump twelve times to grow taller, and beach partiers in Brazil jump over seven waves at midnight while making seven wishes. Jumping is a thing on New Year's Eve, apparently.
< br />Photo: Garrett/Flickr CC