5 reasons why iPad Pro’s new Magic Keyboard blows our minds

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iPad-Pro-Magic-Trackpad
Everything we wanted the Smart Keyboard to be.
Photo: Apple

Apple’s exciting new Magic Keyboard is going to make working on iPad Pro better than ever when the accessory debuts in May. It’s a huge improvement over the Smart Keyboard Folio in so many ways.

Prices start at $299, which makes the Magic Keyboard an expensive upgrade. For many iPad Pro users, however, it will be well worth it. Here are five reasons why the Magic Keyboard with trackpad blows our minds.

How to use your Mac’s Magic Trackpad upside-down

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Trackpad upside-down
It's old and battered, but it still works. Even upside-down.
Photo: Charlie Sorrel/Cult of Mac

If you have a low desk, or you just hate bending your wrists back, then you might consider turning your Magic Trackpad upside down, and using it with the lower end of its wedge away from you. With the trackpad upside-down, its slope will better watch your hand’s natural shape and position.

But flipping the trackpad also flips the direction of the mouse pointer, right? Up is down, down is up, and left and right don’t know where they are any more. Wrong! If you have an older Mac, you can just type a command into the Terminal to allow automatic orientation detection. And on newer Macs — from Sierra onward, I believe — there’s an equally easy trick.

Transform your Mac’s trackpad with the 3-finger drag

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Magic Trackpad foot
Clicking can be a drag.
Photo: Charlie Sorrel/Cult of Mac

I prefer the Mac’s trackpad to a mouse in every way but one. It’s more comfortable, it relieves RSI, it can be used equally easily by the left or right hand, and it does scrolling and multitouch. But the one thing it’s terrible at is actually clicking. Specifically, clicking and dragging to move a window, or to make a selection. And I’m still using the original Magic Trackpad, the one that runs on AA batteries. It has physical switches in its feet, so clicking is a lot harder at its top edge.

Enter the three-finger drag. This Mac accessibility setting lets you tap with three fingers to simulate a click and drag. And it does a lot more than just making it easier to move windows around the screen.

How to add trackpad gestures to your Magic Mouse

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better touch tool magic mouse
Make the Magic Mouse more magic.
Photo: Harpal Singh/Unsplash

For most computer users, the trackpad is the default control device, and that’s because we mostly use laptops. And Apple’s trackpads are great. If you’ve only ever used MacBook or Magic trackpads, then you won’t know how bad things can get on the PC side of the wall.

Mice, though, are still better in many ways, especially if you have the large screen of an iMac to traverse. Or if you just prefer accuracy: It’s easier to pinpoint something quickly with a mouse. Apple’s Magic Mouse adds a trackpad’s essential swipe-to-scroll features, but lacks other handy abilities, like tap-to-click, and two-finger taps. Today we’ll see how to add those tricks to the Magic Mouse.

How to use a mouse with your iPad

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trackpad mode
Trackpads -- not just for the Mac any more.
Photo: Charlie Sorrel/Cult of Mac

The iPadOS beta is out, and it has one killer feature — mouse support. Not only can you use any Bluetooth mouse or trackpad to control the text-selection cursor on the iPad, you can use the mouse just like you would on a Mac — clicking buttons anywhere in the entire iPad user interface.

The feature is not on by default. It’s not even a regular checkbox. To enable mouse and trackpad support on your iPad, you have to dig into the Accessibility settings.

iPad finally gets mouse support thanks to iPadOS

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An iPad Pro with Smart Keyboard Folio and Magic Mouse, or a MacBook by another name?
Exciting news for full-time iPad users.
Photo: Guilherme Martins Schasiepen

WWDC 2019 bugApple rushed through a lot of iOS 13 features during its keynote this morning, but a major feature that’s long been requested from iPad users didn’t get any showtime: mouse support.

When Apple’s keynote wrapped up without any mention of mouse support on iPad my colleague Killian nearly had an embolism burst in his brain. The feature had been rumored for so long it would have been a huge disappointment if it didn’t make the cut. But after digging into iPadOS, it turns out that Apple has finally added mouse support.

Check it out in action:

What we love (and don’t) about Apple’s New iMacs and magic peripherals on The CultCast

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Ain't she a beaut?
Ain't she a beaut?
Photo: Apple

This week on Cult of Mac’s podcast: The pros and cons of Apple’s new 4K and 5K iMacs, plus, the new Magic Keyboard, Magic Mouse 2 and Magic Trackpad 2 — we’ve got our grubby hands on Apple’s new peripherals and we’re ready to share what we love (and what we don’t).

And stay tuned for CultCast 2nd Hour with guest Blake J. Harris, author of Console Wars: Sega, Nintendo, and the Battle that Defined a Generation, to be regaled with the story of the 90s video game war that pitted newcomer, Sega of America, against Nintendo, maker of Super Mario Brothers, Duck Hunt, and the unstoppable force that was the Nintendo Entertainment System.

Apple releases ‘stunning’ new 4K and 5K iMacs

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Screen Shot 2015-10-13 at 14.26.03
Apple's iMacs just got even sweeter.
Photo: Apple

Apple today revealed its refreshed line of iMacs, including a brand new 21.5-inch 4K Retina iMac and 27-inch 5K Retina model.

The smaller iMac now matches the pixel density of the larger 5K iMac, giving it 4.5 times the resolution of Full HD. The 27-inch iMac, meanwhile, boasts Retina 5K displays across the board, whereas previously they were available only for the $2,499 flagship iMac.

The 21.5-inch 4K iMac starts at $1,499, while the 27-inch version starts at $1,799.