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A password manager like Dashlane can keep you from losing your business's good reputation.
A password manager like Dashlane can keep you from losing your business's good reputation.
Photo: Dashlane

Patched iOS vulnerability would have let users seize control of iPhones over Wi-Fi

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Airdrop ios iPad iPhone
Vulnerability relied on the tech that makes AirDrop work
Photo: Charlie Sorrel/Cult of Mac

A security vulnerability patched by Apple earlier this year could have allowed users to remote access an entire iPhone over Wi-Fi without the need for any user interaction, a security researcher has revealed.

Ian Beer, a researcher at Google’s vulnerability research unit Project Zero, shared details of the vulnerability Tuesday. He spent six months developing proof-of-concept exploits to prove its effectiveness. Fortunately, he doesn’t believe a similar exploit was ever utilized by hackers in the wild.

Zoom rushes to fix its webcam-accessing flaw on Macs

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Apple offers up to $1.5 million to anyone who spots a software flaw
Flaw allowed hackers to access other people's webcams.
Photo: United Artists

Zoom conference calls are as much of a part of modern office working life as disagreements about the air-con system.

But security researcher Jonathan Leitschuh recently stumbled upon something extremely concerning. As discovered by Leitschuh, Zoom featured a vulnerability that allowed hackers to break into a target’s Mac webcam. This happened regardless of whether the Mac user was using Safari, Chrome or Firefox.

Fortunately, Zoom has, well, zoomed to correct it.

Don’t fall for the Twitter prank that locks you out

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Twitter has changed its mind on deleting inactive user accounts (for now)
Twitter is crushing dreams in 2020.
Photo: Jim Merithew/Cult of Mac

A viral prank is getting some Twitter users locked out of their accounts.

Tweets that promise you’ll receive new color schemes, admin privileges, or even a verified check mark for changing your birthday have been circulating on the platform. But if you fall for the trick, all you will end up with is a Twitter account you can no longer use.

How to check if your Facebook account was hacked

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FAcebook
Some of the alerts you might see in the Facebook app.
Photo: Facebook

30 million accounts on Facebook were recently hacked with attackers gaining access to highly sensitive personal information.

The FBI is investigating the hacking an has asked the company not to reveal who was behind it. Facebook originally disclosed the hack to the public two weeks ago saying 50 million accounts were compromised. That number has now been reduced to just 30 million, but the amount of data stolen makes it the worst attack in Facebook’s history.

Download iOS 11.2.1 immediately for crucial HomeKit fixes

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homekit
HomeKit's huge security flaw has been fixed.
Photo: Apple

Apple released a brand new iOS 11 update for the iPad and iPhone this morning that makes some big fixes to HomeKit.

iOS 11.2.1 comes a little over a week after Apple dropped iOS 11.2 on the public bringing Apple Pay Cash and a host of bug fixes. The new update is being released along with tvOS 11.2.1 to restore some HomeKit functionality after Apple patched a bug server-side earlier this week.

Hackers claim they fooled Face ID with cheap mask

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Face ID iPhone X
Face ID has already been hacked.
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

Hackers may have already proven that Face ID isn’t quite as secure as secure as Apple claims.

Using a simple 3D printed mask, Vietnamese security firm Bkav, has posted a video showing an iPhone X being unlocked after unveiling a composite 3D-printed mask made of plastic, makeup, silicone and paper cutouts for some facial features.

There’s a serious security flaw in Wi-Fi and we’re all at risk

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KRACK Wi-Fi attack
Beware the KRACK attack.
Photo: Mathy Vanhoef

A major security flaw has been discovered in Wi-Fi and we’re all at risk.

Researchers discovered the weakness in WPA2, the protocol that secures all modern Wi-Fi networks. Any modern device with a wireless connection could be open to a KRACK attack that would expose information like credit card numbers, passwords, messages and more.

What to do if you were affected by the massive Equifax hack

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hack
143 million customers in the U.S. may have been impacted by the attack.
Photo: Colin / Wikimedia Commons

Credit report giant Equifax confirms a “cybersecurity incident” may have compromised the data of 143 million U.S. customers.

Criminals gained access to Social Security numbers, dates of birth, addresses, credit card numbers and more between mid-May and July of this year. It’s one of the biggest and most worrisome data breaches in history.

Here’s what to do if you’re one of the customers affected.