Apple supplier CEO meets with President Donald Trump

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Terry Gou
Terry Gou is running for president of Taiwan.
Photo: Voice of America/Wikimedia Commons

Foxconn CEO Terry Gou visited President Donald Trump at the White House yesterday. Foxconn, which was founded by Gou, is one of Apple’s biggest manufacturers.

Gou discussed his plans to run for office in Taiwan, where he hopes to become president in next year’s elections. He assured Trump that he would be a friendly partner of the U.S. if elected. “If I am elected, I would be seeking to go to Washington,” he reportedly told the U.S. President.

Foxconn CEO may be headed to White House to discuss Wisconsin factory

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Foxconn
Plan for Foxconn's Wisconsin factory seem to have changed along the way.
Photo: CBS

Departing Foxconn chairman Terry Gou is reportedly heading to the U.S. where he will have a meeting at the White House. The subject of the meeting will be Foxconn’s plans to open a factory in Wisconsin.

Foxconn maintains that it’s working hard to deliver the factory it received $4 billion in tax breaks for. However, behind-the-scenes dealings suggest that the company may be trying to renegotiate terms.

Future iPhones could boast MicroLED displays

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iPhone XS Max
And Foxconn wants to build them for Apple.
Photo: Ed Hardy/Cult of Mac

Apple could use next-gen MicroLED displays for a future iPhone, a new report claims.

The report claims that Foxconn, Apple’s biggest supplier, is working hard to win MicroLED orders from Apple — and the iPhone is singled out as the likely recipient.

Foxconn wants to change the terms of its Wisconsin factory deal

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Foxconn Wisconsin
Foxconn previously agreed a massive deal to build a factory in Wisconsin.
Photo: Foxconn

Foxconn promises that it’s working hard to deliver the Wisconsin factory it received $4 billion in tax breaks for. However, behind-the-scenes dealings show that the company could be trying to renegotiate terms.

A letter from Wisconsin Governor Tony Evers indicates that Foxconn proposed a change to the deal back in March. It is now planning to submit “the necessary documentation” to do so in the coming weeks.

Foxconn promises it’s committed to Wisconsin factory

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Foxconn Wisconsin
Foxconn is recruiting temporary workers to build new iPhones.
Photo: Foxconn

Foxconn swears its committed to bringing 13,000 jobs to Wisconsin just two days after the state’s governor said it wants out from its deal with the Taiwanese company.

Wisconsin governor Tony Evers, who inherited the deal when he took over office in January, said recently that he wants to renegotiate the parameters of the deal that gives Foxconn $4 billion in tax breaks. Not wanting to miss out on all those incentives, Foxconn is adamant about maintaining its course.

Founder of Apple’s most famous supplier is stepping down

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Terry Gou
Foxconn founder Terry Gou, right, says he will resign soon.
Photo: Voice of America/Wikimedia Commons

The founder of Foxconn, whose biggest customer, Apple, helped it rise to be the world’s top contract electronics manufacturer, says he plans to step aside to allow a younger executive to take over.

CEO Terry Gou did not give a timeline when he confirmed to a Reuters reporter his plans to resign from the Taiwan-based company he started with a loan from his mom around the same time Steve Jobs launched Apple.

Apple and Foxconn, a history [Cook book outtakes]

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Foxconn workers spell company's name
Workers spell out the company's name at one of Foxconn's giant plants.
Photo: Foxconn

Tim Cook book outtakes: How Apple's Operations department works This post was going to be part of my new book, Tim Cook: The Genius Who Took Apple to the Next Level, but was cut for length or continuity. Over the next week or so, we will be publishing several more sections that were cut, focusing mostly on geeky details of Apple’s manufacturing operations.

Foxconn was founded around the same time as Apple, although 6,000 miles away on the other side of the world. In 1974, when 19-year-old Steve Jobs was working at Atari, 24-year-old Terry Gou borrowed $7,500 ($37,000 in today’s money) from his mother to start up a business.

How Ops operates back at Apple HQ [Cook book outtakes]

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Blind survey
Operations accounts for a big part of the staff headcount at Apple Park.
Photo: Duncan Sinfield

Tim Cook book outtakes: How Apple's Operations department works This post was going to be part of my new book, Tim Cook: The Genius Who Took Apple to the Next Level, but was cut for length or continuity. Over the next week or so, we will be publishing several more sections that were cut, focusing mostly on geeky details of Apple’s manufacturing operations.

As iPhone growth exploded, Apple struggled to keep up with demand. Every year, the number of iPhones sold would double, which meant that Apple kept adding new suppliers and assembly operations to keep up. It was a monumental struggle.

Inside Apple’s factories [Cook book outtakes]

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Apple factory workers in China
Workers examine a camera module in one of Apple's factories in China.
Photo: Apple

Tim Cook book outtakes: How Apple's Operations department works This post was going to be part of my new book, Tim Cook: The Genius Who Took Apple to the Next Level, but was cut for length or continuity. Over the next week or so, we will be publishing several more sections that were cut, focusing mostly on geeky details of Apple’s manufacturing operations.

A good measure of the size of Apple’s manufacturing operations is its capital expenditure, the amount of money spends on things like buildings and equipment.

Apple’s capital expenditure, or CapEx, is mindboggling. To get an idea of how big it is, take Apple’s new spaceship campus in Cupertino – which is the fourth most expensive building in the world. It cost the company an estimated $5 billion to construct.

Apple spends a similar amount every six months on manufacturing equipment.