Soon you might be able to afford a gold Apple Watch

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Rich single men must choose their watch carefully.
Rich single men must choose their watch carefully.
Photo: Apple

Wearing a gold Apple Watch might get a lot cheaper really soon, according to a new report that claims Apple is looking to create a less expensive gold version of its famous timepiece.

The current Apple Watch Edition currently costs between $10,000 – $17,000 but ‘people close to the product’ have told the New York Times that Apple is exploring new metal finishes for the Apple Watch, and they may even be ready in time to debut at next week’s iPhone 6s event.

How to turn your $399 Apple Watch gold

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apple-gold-paint
When life gives you an ugly Apple Watch, paint that shit gold. Photo: Casey Neistat
Photo: Casey Neistat

 

Lusting after the gold Apple Watch Edition but don’t have the funds for Jony Ive’s $17,000 timepiece? You could take out a second mortgage on the house, or sell a kidney. Or you could do what artist Casey Neistat did and manually turn an Apple Watch Sport into a golden beauty.

Neistat only had $399, so he decided to preorder the black Sport model and then carefully painted it gold. Sure, his method might void your warrant, and it doesn’t look perfect, but it’s better than spending your kid’s college savings just to be as fly as Drake.

You can do it too, just follow the steps in the video below:

Video shows how black market took over the iPhone 6 lines

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Photo: Casey Neistat
Photo: Casey Neistat

In many places around the world, around the first 50 people in line waiting for the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus last week appeared to be resellers — looking to make a quick (and relatively easy) buck selling Apple’s next generation iPhone on the gray/black market.

While we definitely noticed the phenomenon, YouTube filmmaker Casey Neistat took his camera out on the streets of New York to interview and film the crowds gathered waiting for the new handsets at various Apple Stores around the city.

“Gone are the spirit and excitement from years past,” Neistat observes. “These lines are now about something else entirely.”