This beautiful gaming art belongs on your wall

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Game: Sunset Overdrive
Artist: Vasili Sorin
Developer: Insomniac Games
Publisher: Microsoft Studios

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Instead of trotting out the cliché question, “Are games art?,” an exhibit at the Electronic Entertainment Expo aims to explore the actual artwork from upcoming and recently announced video games.

Long gone are the pixellated abstracts of yesteryear: these are fully realized, gorgeous works of art in various styles, hung for all to see in the Los Angeles Convention Center, where the Expo takes place this week.

Developing today’s graphics-rich video games –mobile, console, or PC — takes a lot of time, talent, and passion, and the images above show the kind of artistic energy that is put into them. From the painterly styles of artwork from Assassin’s Creed Unity and Destiny to the poster illustration of The Banner Saga and Sunset Overdrive, there’s a lot to like in the images above.

All photos by Rob LeFebvre/Cult of Mac

Apple’s original rainbow office signs hit the auction block

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From 1993 until 1997, Apple’s rainbow logo smiled down from the east-facing side of Infinite Loop’s Building 3 as drivers sped north on Highway 280.

Now these Styrofoam and fiberglass signs are treated like fine art being peddled by one of the world’s oldest and most prestigious auctioneers.

Two rainbow Apple logos from the company’s original offices will be put up for auction next month at Bonhams and even though they come with some wear and tear, these Apple logos will cost you more than all your previous Apple purchases combined.

Motion Artist: Make Your Own Interactive Comics Simply And Easily [Deals]

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All you comic lovers and designers out there…get ready. Cult of Mac Deals has some software on sale that takes your designs, characters and stories and puts them in motion to create the story you have been visualizing.

We all love having plenty of space to work and learning time-saving cool techniques. With Motion Artist you can layout comic panels and image layers in any way possible using a large, user-friendly workspace and with its dynamic camera action automatically creates a cinematic experience. And Cult of Mac Deals has this killer application for 66% off – just $19.99 – during this limited time offer.

Macintosh “Picasso” Artwork Was Actually Inspired By Matisse, Artist Says

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Artwork by Matisse (left) inspired the Mac Picasso graphics.

The famous Macintosh “Picasso” trademark logo was developed for the introduction of the original 128k Mac back in 1984. A minimalist line drawing reminiscent of the style of Pablo Picasso, this whimsical graphic implied the whole of a computer in a few simple strokes. It was an icon of what was inside the box, and became as famous as the computer it represented.

The logo was designed by Tom Hughes and John Casado, art directors on the Macintosh development team. Originally the logo was to be a different concept by artist Jean-Michel Folon, but before launch it was replaced by the colorful line drawing. It’s been famous ever since, and the style has endured across decades.

Casado recently attended the 30th Anniversary of the Mac celebration, and emailed Cult of Mac to shed some light on the history of this famous graphic. It turns out Picasso was not the primary inspiration for this after all – rather, it was Henri Matisse!

Design Your Dream Home With Live Interior 3D For Mac [Deals]

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Ever wondered what your house would look like if you added an extra room? What about a new set of furniture? Stop wondering and start building the home of your dreams right on your Mac.

Whether you’re a casual user looking to redesign your home or a professional designer preparing a mockup for clients, Live Interior 3D is a powerful and intuitive home and interior design application that will help you get the job done no matter your skill level. And Cult of Mac Deals has it for only $19.99 – a savings of 50%!

Mobile Artist Profile: David Scott Leibowitz, Renaissance Man 2.0

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©Michael Highmead "It's Closer than you think" from Zen and the Art of iPhoneography.

This story first appeared in Cult of Mac Magazine.

It’s easy to think of David Scott Leibowitz, whose work fronts this week’s magazine cover,  as kind of a renaissance man 2.0: the artist, app developer and author is a tireless champion of the new when it comes to visual arts.

Mobile Artist Profile: Roz Hall And His Painterly Pixels

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"Freckles" @Roz Hall

Roz Hall is a UK-based artist who employs his iPad as a canvas to create some stunning portraits.

Hall wasn’t always a painter with pixels: he studied Fine Art at the Winchester School of art and is currently at work on a Master’s of Fine Art at the University of Chichester.

He’s worked as a filmmaker and in video production, but his main love since 2010 has been painting, at first on the iPhone, and now on the iPad.

This father, student and self-described beard enthusiast told Cult of Mac about his artwork, the perks of tablet painting and why naked Apple devices are best.

"Self Portrait In Yellow Glasses" @Roz Hall
“Self Portrait In Yellow Glasses” @Roz Hall

Cult of Mac: What apps do you use, and why? Any apps you started using but don’t anymore? What’s the evolution of your process?

Roz Hall: My two favorite apps are Procreate and Inkpad, and I use them both for two very different things. Procreate is great for recreating that paint or ink feel as it has some wonderful brushes, which are completely customizable if you wish. Inkpad is a vector app, like a stripped down version of Illustrator, but very intuitive to use and awesome if you want to print off something really large! I used to use Sketchbook Pro as it’s a very advanced app and lovely to use, but I feel like the brushes are a little small and I like to start out with a large brush to block in shapes. I prefer to stick to a single brush type for each painting and just adjust the size and opacity, this probably comes from my background as a traditional artist.

CoM: What device do you use? Why? Any covers, cases, or peripherals you prefer?

RH: I started painting on my iPhone 3G but upgraded to the iPad and am now on the 3rd Generation iPad. The screen size is perfect, small enough to paint with on the train without drawing too much attention, and large enough to not feel restricted. I mainly just use my finger but have used a few different styluses.

My current favourite is the Sensu Brush, which has a small rubber tip on one side and an actual brush on the other. I was genuinely surprised at how natural that would feel, as I’d thought it sounded like a gimmick. I have played with a couple that offer pressure sensitivity but couldn’t get on with them, although the new JOT Touch looks promising. I like to have my Apple gear fairly naked as it feels criminal to cover them up, so I just have my iPad in its Smart Cover.

"Emma in blue top" @Roz Hall
“Emma in blue top” @Roz Hall

CoM: How do you sell you art work? What are the unique challenges of creating commercially viable artwork on a digital device? The unique rewards?

RH: I have sold a few postcards on Zazzle and have painted a couple of commissions, but apart from that I don’t see it as a hugely commercial venture. I won’t be quitting my day job quite yet. Companies have send hardware to me to use and blog about, including tablets, which is a huge perk.

I was recently flown to New York to attend the launch of the Microsoft Surface 2 and to demonstrate to the press. So if you’re reading this, Apple, I’m available! The art community is getting less suspicious of digital art with artists such as Tracey Emin and David Hockney producing work on the iPad, which is making it easier to get work into serious galleries.

CoM: How do you exhibit your work?

RH: I am fortunate enough to have had work exhibited across the globe but the format changes depending on the gallery requirements. Some like to have your work printed and framed traditionally, where as others like to project or display using LCD screens. The Saatchi Gallery in London exhibited some of my portraits on a large LCD screen but had it in landscape mode, which didn’t look good at all. I have just started to get pieces printed onto perspex glass, it looks gorgeous as the colors are really strong and the glossy look mimics that of the iPad screen.

"The Beast" @Roz Hall
“The Beast” @Roz Hall

CoM: What kind of community to you belong to or facilitate for digital artists? Is there an “I make art on an iPad” group you hang out with?

RH: When I started out painting on the iPhone, I got myself a Flickr account and posted them up there. The reaction was incredible and immediate!

That’s what I love about creating work digitally. I have oil paintings which have been seen by maybe five or six people and now just sit in my attic, but when I paint on the iPad, I post up to Flickr and can get 500-600 views in a day. Flickr has a strong community of mobile digital artists, who mainly share their work in groups dedicated to different hardware and apps.

Good ones to check out are iAMDA (The International Association of Mobile Digital Artists), iPad Creative, iPad Art and Fingerpainted. Facebook has iPad Artists and iPad painters Groups, which are great places to share tips and comment on each others work.

CoM: Any advice for artists looking to work on the iPad or other devices? Would you recommend it to new artists?

RH: Painting is a hobby of mine. I have a full-time job, a growing family and I’m studying part time, so if I get an opportunity to paint, I have to be quick. Using the iPad means that I can paint wherever I am and whenever I have a free few minutes. You don’t need to have a room set up with canvases and an easel permanently taking up space. It’s inexpensive too, after the initial hit of the hardware itself, you can realistically paint for as long as you like without having to order in new paint…

"Tartan" @Roz Hall
“Tartan” @Roz Hall

You can check out more of Roz’s work at his website.