How to protect your Mac, iPhone, iPad from Efail email exploit

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EFAIL lets hackers read encrypted emails on your iPhone.
EFAIL lets hackers read encrypted emails on your iPhone.
Photo: Ed Hardy/Cult of Mac

Researchers in Europe have discovered a way to read the contents of encrypted emails sent with iOS and macOS devices. The so-called Efail exploit is significant enough that the Electronic Frontier Foundation calls it an “immediate risk.”

Apple is certainly working on a patches for all its devices, but there are ways to protect your laptop, phone and tablet now.

Apple shrugs off recent bugs as ‘one bad week’

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Phil Schiller said Apple won't release the HomePod till it's satisfied with the quality.
Phil Schiller said Apple won't release the HomePod till it's satisfied with the quality.
Photo: Digital Trends

Apple fans and enthusiastic gadget reviewers will ultimately remember 2017 as the year of a reinvented iPhone. But as the year draws to an end, Apple marketing chief Phil Schiller has a few other things on his mind, such as delays in releasing the company’s first smart speaker and a “bad week” of software bugs and security holes.

In-app purchases flaw exposes developers to costly hacks

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App Store icon
With 2 million apps, the App Store is almost too big.
Photo: PhotoAtelier/Flickr

Sloppy coding in some popular iOS games allows hackers to give themselves and others thousands of dollars’ worth of in-app purchases for free.

The hole was discovered by developers at DigiDNA, creator of a backup tool called iMazing that allows iPhone and iPad users to access their devices’ hidden file systems. The developers found that the app backup/restore feature in iMazing 1.3 exposes weaknesses in the way games like Angry Birds 2 and Tetris Free handle in-app purchases.

To demonstrate how easy it is to hack in-app purchases using this method, the DigiDNA team tweaked Angry Birds 2 to start the game with 999,999,999 gems — the equivalent of $10,000 of in-game credits.