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Super-rare Steve Jobs business card heads for auction

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Very early Steve Jobs business card heads for auction
Although Steve Jobs co-founded Apple, he didn’t run it. And you can own a business card that proves it.
Screenshot: Alfred DiBlasi

In the very early days of Apple, co-founder Steve Jobs was VP Operations. And Alfred DiBlasi has one of Jobs’ business cards to prove it.

The card will soon go up for auction. You can own this bit of Apple history if you’re willing to put down enough cash.

Pristine Apple sneakers will transport you back to the ’90s — for a price

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These ultra-rare Apple Computer Sneakers might auction for big bucks
A pair of Apple’s first wearables might sell for a high price because they’ve never been worn.
Photo: Heritage Auctions

A couple of pieces of Apple history are on the auction block. An unworn pair Apple Computer Sneakers from the mid-1990s will be sold in the next two days. A rare Apple-branded paddle ball set from the same time is also being auctioned.

Rare Apple sneakers go for almost $10,000

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Apple sneakers are a momento of the bad old days at Apple.
These Apple sneakers sold for a amount that might make a downpayment on a house.
Photo: Heritage Auctions

A nearly unique pair of Apple sneakers was sold at auction this week. And this bit of company memorabilia from the 1990s pulled in close to $10,000.

Yellowed Apple retail sign from 1978 might pull in $20,000

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apple retail sign up for auction
Pre-Apple Store retail efforts.
Photo: Nate D. Sanders Auctions

Apple’s retail origins were far less glossy than today’s glass shrines known as Apple Stores. If a dealer wanted to sell an Apple II in 1978, the fledgling computer company provided a 4-foot-by-5-foot acrylic sign in a metal frame. On the face was a rainbow Apple logo over the words “apple computer.” No capital letters.

Bidding on one of those original signs starts at $20,000 in an online auction that ends in three days.

Steve Jobs’ signature made this one of the most expensive floppy disks ever

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This 3.5-inch Macintosh floppy disk signed by Steve Jobs is up for auction.
Steve Jobs signatures are rare, and this one is on a nice price of memorabilia.
Photo: RR Auctions

A Macintosh floppy disk signed by Apple co-founder Steve Jobs sold at auction for many thousands of dollars more than expected.

This is terribly ironic considering Jobs helped kill the floppy disk by pulling disk readers out of Apple laptops and desktops. Now his signature resulted in one of the most expensive disks ever.

Macworld mag signed by Steve Jobs goes up for auction

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Steve Jobs Macworld autograph
Not everyone gets Steve Jobs to give an autograph.
Photo: RR Auction

A piece of a well-known story about Steve Jobs’ disdain for giving autographs goes on the auction block Thursday.

At the 2006 opening of an Apple Store in New York City, the Apple co-founder initially refused the request of a man in a wheelchair who had hoped Jobs would sign his copy of the premiere issue of Macworld magazine.

Jobs, according to witnesses, was joking when he said no. He eventually acquiesced and signed the magazine, “To Matt” followed by “steven jobs.” (He rarely used capital letters when signing his name.)

Steve Jobs’ autograph could cost you $50,000

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Steve Jobs autograph
That signature lower-case-letter-style of signing.
Photo: Nate D Sanders/Paul Fraser Collectibles

Apple co-founder Steve Jobs had little time or interest in signing autographs for fans.

But if you are in possession of the rare exception, you have a signature considered the most valuable, according to a guide that tracks the values of the most sought-after autographs.

Why John Sculley doesn’t wear an Apple Watch (and regrets booting Steve Jobs)

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Fremont, California, 1990.
John Sculley, photographed in 1990 when he was Apple CEO.
Photo: Doug Menuez

John Sculley may be best known to a generation of Apple fans as the CEO who made the company choose between him and Steve Jobs. But he’s also a successful investor, mentor and entrepreneur — as well as the person who increased Apple’s sales from $800 million to $8 billion during his decade at the top.

In an interview with Cult of Mac, Sculley, who ran Apple from 1983 to 1993, tells why he doesn’t wear an Apple Watch, makes the case that AAPL stock is undervalued, explains how the Steve Jobs movie twisted facts, and talks about his new book Moonshot and the future of entrepreneurism.