Stolen Apple IDs reportedly used for Chinese mobile payment thefts

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Alipay
Alipay is one of the mobile payment services where users have reportedly had money taken.
Photo: Alipay

Hackers in China have used stolen Apple IDs to make off with cash from customers’ Alipay and Tencent accounts, two popular Chinese mobile payments service.

In a post on Weibo, Alipay said that it has contacted Apple to determine the exact details of the breach. It also warned that users who have linked their Apple IDs to mobile payment services should lower their transaction limits. Tencent has also gotten in contact with Apple.

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Apple Data and Privacy website
Apple’s new Data and Privacy website has all the tools you need.
Photo: Apple

iOS developers get new tools that let you download and delete iCloud data

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Apple takes privacy seriously
A pop-up in iOS 11.3 gives Apple's commitment to privacy.
Photo: Ed Hardy/Cult of Mac

Apple is giving developers new tools that will allow iPhone and iPad users to download and delete any personal information being stored in iCloud.

Developers received word of the new tools today which were created in order to help developers comply with the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation that goes into effect this May. The new laws mean developers will be forced to comply anytime a customer requests to access manage, restrict or delete personal data.

You can soon see (and delete) everything Apple knows about you

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Apple takes privacy seriously
A pop-up in iOS 11.3 gives Apple's commitment to privacy.
Photo: Ed Hardy/Cult of Mac

Apple will soon let you download all the information it has stored about you, modify it, or even delete it. The privacy change is required by a new European law, but is also in-line with Apple’s policy to not spy on its customers. This sets it apart from rivals like Google and Facebook.

Cult of Mac Magazine: Why you shouldn’t trust every Apple ID prompt, and more

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Although the popup will look exactly the same, it could be a phishing attempt. It’s incredibly easy for developers to implement popups.
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

It’s not uncommon to see a random popup that asks you to “Sign In to iTunes Store” on iOS. They sometimes appear unexpectedly, but they’re usually genuine. There is a chance that the app’s developer is phishing for your Apple ID password. We’ll show you an easy trick to distinguish legit popups from phishing attempts.

In this week’s issue, you’ll find that story and more. Find out Apple Watch Series 3’s innovative eSIM works. Check out five ways to quickly switch apps on iPad with iOS 11. Don’t miss your last chance to win an a free iPhone 8, and more. Get your free subscription to Cult of Mac Magazine from iTunes. Or read on for this week’s top stories.

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Not all Apple ID prompts are created equal.
Not all Apple ID prompts are created equal.
Photo: Jan Vašek/Pixabay CC

Cult of Mac Magazine: Why ARKit will be huge for Apple and more!

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ARKit is going to be massively important for Apple.
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

Apple’s got no shortage of big launches coming in the next few weeks, but the one with the biggest long-term potential for Apple is ARKit. This is going to be massively important for Apple.

In this week’s issue of Cult of Mac Magazine, you’ll find that story and more. Get the latest iPhone 8 keynote event predictions. And learn how to stop your iCloud and Apple ID from getting hacked. Save big in our Watch Store this Labor Day weekend! Get your free subscription to Cult of Mac Magazine from iTunes. Or read on for this week’s top stories.