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Apple will drop Aperture support after macOS Mojave

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Aperture support to end
Still using Aperture? It might be time to give it up.
Photo: Apple

Photographers still clinging to Apple’s discontinued imaging software, Aperture, must now deal with a ticking clock.

Apple announced Aperture will not get support from future MacOS past Mojave and have issued a support document encouraging Mac-based shooters to migrate their photo libraries.

Everything you need to know about your iPhone camera’s aperture

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Here I could have blurred the netting by using a wider aperture.
Here I could have blurred the netting by using a wider aperture.
Photo: Charlie Sorrel/Cult of Mac

A few days ago, we learned about the iPhone’s shutter, the part of the camera that “opens and closes” to let light onto the sensor. Today, we’re taking an in-depth look at the aperture, aka hole. The aperture is an opening in the lens that can be made bigger or smaller. Like shutter speed, its primary purpose is to control how much light reacts with camera the sensor (or film).

Also like shutter speed, aperture has some extra effects on how the image looks. Specifically, it can control how much of the image, front to back, looks sharp.

Picktorial 3 is the upgrade your photos need

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If you miss Aperture, trying editing your images with Picktorial 3.
If you miss Aperture, trying editing your images with Picktorial 3.
Photo: Picktorial

Many professional photographers collectively groaned in 2014 when Apple discontinued the popular photo editing software Aperture. Shooters loved how they could edit and organize with one powerful program.

But some software companies stepped up to aid anxious Mac-centric photographers. One was an Israel-based startup called Picktorial, which released an updated version today.

Adobe’s new Lightroom 6 is the best Aperture alternative

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Photo: Adobe

Today Adobe released Lightroom 6, cementing the photo editor as the best alternative to Apple’s now-extinct Aperture.

For Adobe Creative Cloud subscribers, the new app is called Lightroom CC. While perhaps the biggest enhancement is related to speed and performance, there are also a few new features users should find helpful.

Hands on with OS X’s new Photos app

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Photos for Mac is coming this spring. Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac
Photos for Mac is coming this spring. Photo: Stephen Smith/Cult of Mac

Apple’s upcoming Photos app will give Mac users powerful new tools to manage, tweak and share their favorite images. While it won’t be released until later this year, we got a chance to play around with the beta version now available to developers, and we found it to be an easy-to-use and streamlined piece of software.

For a detailed and visual look at this new iOS-influenced app, check out the video below for a quick run through some of Photos’ hottest new features.

Apple delays Photos for Mac release until spring

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The new photo viewer in Photos for Mac. Now coming this spring. Photo: Apple
The new photo viewer in Photos for Mac. Now coming this spring. Photo: Apple

When Apple killed development of iPhoto and Aperture last summer, it promised a replacement that would blend the best of the two apps into one solution: Photos for Mac.

Originally promised to arrive in “early 2015,” Photos for Mac is available for the first time in a new developer-only beta of OS X Yosemite. Unfortunately, everyone else will have to wait a little longer to get their hands on it.

Adobe outlines how to switch to Lightroom once Apple kills Aperture

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Now that Apple has ceased development of Aperture, it’s time to start looking for alternative photo management and editing solutions. The obvious choice is Lightroom, which Adobe has committed to continue work on heavily in the future.

Adobe is working on a migration tool to take all of your Aperture data and bring it to Lightroom, but until then, the company has outlined how to make the switch on your own.

Picture-perfect strategy: Why killing Aperture means Apple will rule the cloud

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An aperture. Charlie Sorrel/Cult of Mac
Apple and Adobe make major moves to change the way we manage our photographs. Photo: Charlie Sorrel/Cult of Mac

Ubiquitous cloud storage and editing solutions for your photos are like buses: You wait ages for one, and then two come along at once.

Both Apple and Adobe are going all-in on allowing you to view and edit your photos on any device. Adobe has done this by bringing its Lightroom desktop app to mobile. Apple is doing it by ditching iPhoto and Aperture and starting again with the upcoming Photos app for iOS.

While the approaches are different, they both look rad. And they’ll drive a fundamental shift in the way we manage our photos.

Apple kills development of Aperture and iPhoto for OS X

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aperture

Apple gave developers an early preview of its upcoming Photos app this month at WWDC, but what it didn’t tell anyone is that new app for iOS will also overthrow Apple’s iPhoto and Aperture apps for OS X.

A new Photos app for OS X isn’t expected to land on Macs until next year, but in a statement released to The Loop, Apple says it has already stopped development on its professional photography application, Aperture.

Here’s the official statement: