How to use Picture in Picture mode to watch YouTube on iPad

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YouTube videos come to Picture in Picture mode on iOS 9, thanks to Corner Tube.
YouTube videos come to Picture in Picture mode on iOS 9, thanks to Corner Tube.
Photo: App Advice

Picture in Picture mode is one of the best features of iOS 9. On iPads, it lets you continue to watch a video from one app (say, Netflix) in the corner of your screen, even while you’re browsing a webpage, reading your email, and so on.

A lot of cool video apps already support Picture in Picture mode, but curiously, Google’s YouTube app isn’t one of them. But if you want to watch YouTube in PiP mode, there’s another app you can try.

Why the $10,000 Watch is essential to Apple’s plan

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Photo: Apple
Photo: Apple

It’s taken all week, but I finally think I have a pretty good idea why Apple is selling a crazy-expensive, super-exclusive gold watch.

Initially, the very idea that Apple would make something for the one percent seemed abhorrent. What makes Apple great is that it sells affordable luxury to the masses.

Apple’s well-designed and well-made products should really only be for the rich, but they are generally affordable to the middle classes. Apple pulls off the miraculous, selling us BMWs at Kia prices.

This is what makes the gold Apple Watch Edition stand out. At first glance, it’s obviously not a product for us. But even though you and I will probably never own one, the $10,000 timepiece is actually kinda democratic, because it’s all about selling $350 watches to the masses.

Recycle your iPod, Save the Earth, Save 10% on a New One

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In 2005 Apple responded to mounting pressure from environmental activists by announcing a free recycling program for its iPod digital music players. Fast forward to 2010, five years later, and this wonderful program is still in existence. I thought I should remind you about it, because I nearly forgot about it when my 80 Gb iPod started to act flakey this month after years of service.

The program is a win-win for customers, like myself, that are interested in recycling electronics (an effort to save the Earth), upgrading to a new iPod, and saving 10 percent on a replacement.

The program allows you to bring an iPod that you no longer want regardless of whether or not it is working to any Apple store in the U.S. for free environmentally friendly disposal. The person dropping off any model of iPod will receive a 10 percent discount on the purchase of a new iPod, excluding the iPod shuffle, but you can turn in a shuffle for a 10% discount on a Nano, etc.

All iPods collected for recycling will be processed domestically in the U.S. and no e-waste or hazardous material is shipped overseas.

This is only a small part of Apple’s recycling program which also accepts mobile phones, computers, and monitors. In some cases even these have some monetary value that Apple will convert into a gift card towards the purchase of a new computer, etc.

More information about Apple’s worldwide recycling programs is available at Apple’s environmental website.