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This visual guide to WWDC 2020 hits all the high points

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The virtual WWDC 2020 keynote packed in loads of exciting revelations. Breeze through the highlights in sketchnotes!
The virtual WWDC 2020 keynote packed in loads of exciting revelations. Breeze through all the highlights in these very visual sketchnotes!
Photo: Apple

WWDC 2020 Monday’s WWDC 2020 keynote was very polished and a little fast-paced for me. This year, the entire Worldwide Developers Conference is virtual due to COVID-19, and the presentations flowed seamlessly from presenter to presenter, leaving little time for someone drawing to catch a breath. I ended up with five pages of drawings in my notebook.

I sketched out the important new features coming in iOS 14, iPadOS 14, macOS Big Sur, watchOS 7 and more. For a quick visual recap of the highlights of the WWDC 2020 keynote, check out my sketchnotes below.

Catch our reactions to the WWDC 20 keynote on The CultCast

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The CultCast podcast: Get our reactions to all the new software showcased during the WWDC 2020 keynote.
So ... much ... new ... software!
Photo: Apple

WWDC 2020 On today’s special edition of The CultCast: Catch our reactions to all the great stuff announced at the WWDC 2020 keynote. We highlight our favorite features from iOS 14, MacOS Big Sur, tvOS, iPadOS and watchOS, and so much more.

Today’s episode is supported by CleanMyMac X, an all-in-one utility from MacPaw that takes care of your Mac’s health. It’s a macOS cleaner, a performance monitor, a malware remover and occasionally, a lifesaver. And until July 5, you can go to macpaw.com/cultofmac to get CleanMyMac X with a 30% discount.

After virtual WWDC, Apple should never go back to live keynotes

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During the WWDC 2020 keynote, Apple software chief Craig Federighi reveals big changes coming in iOS 14.
It was certainly a different experience, Craig. I'll give you that.
Photo: Apple

WWDC 2020 Apple turned chicken sh*t into chicken salad with Monday’s WWDC 2020 keynote, and now I don’t want Cupertino to ever go back to doing live keynotes. Crude? Perhaps. Truthful? You bet.

Before the streaming event started, some of my Cult of Mac colleagues discussed how Apple would deal with its first virtual keynote. Some of us thought Apple would simply deliver the same Steve Jobs Theater experience, but with no audience present. (Heck, if Apple wanted to, it could have gone the route of U.K. televised football and added crowd noise.) Others thought Apple would, well, think different.

Apple chose this second option and, in the process, freshened up a formula that has remained the same for years. Here’s why it would be a step backward for Cupertino to consider going back to live keynotes.

‘I Just Go Into Jiggle Mode’ reimagines WWDC keynote as a top-tapping pop hit

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Craig Federighi at WWDC 2020: Is there no end to Craig Federighi's talents?
Is there no end to Craig Federighi's talents?
Photo: Apple

WWDC 2020 One of the low-key highlights following any Apple keynote is seeing how Jonathan Mann, the musical YouTuber who once made Steve Jobs dance, will turn it into a song. This year, Mann’s winning creation is called “I Just Go Into Jiggle Mode,” using a line uttered by Apple software chief Craig Federighi during Monday’s virtual WWDC keynote.

Along with audio clips from the event, Mann also sings tweets written by various online commentators. The results are weird, hilarious — and more than a little catchy. Check out the WWDC 2020 song below.

2020 iMac, AirTags and other rumored devices skip WWDC 2020

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The 2020 iMac could like a bit like this.
The redesigned iMac wasn’t unveiled at WWDC 2020 as had been rumored.
Concept: Ed Hardy/Cult of Mac

WWDC 2020 Although Monday’s keynote address for Apple’s annual developers conference was chock-full of announcements, some much-rumored products didn’t see the light of day.

Despite the rumor mill working overtime in the run-up to WWDC 2020, there was no hardware presented at all.

7 huge changes for Apple users from WWDC 2020

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Tim Cook opened and closed WWDC 2020
CEO Tim Cook and other Apple executives handled the tough job of a WWDC 2020 keynote without an in-person audience.
Screenshot: Apple

WWDC 2020 Apple rose to the challenge of holding a keynote for its annual Worldwide Developers Conference in an empty auditorium Monday. A range of executives took the wraps off operating system upgrades for Mac, iPhone, iPad … the whole swath of Cupertino’s devices.

The presentation went surprisingly well, considering that the COVID-19 pandemic prevented the presence of the usual odd mix of highly enthusiastic Apple employees and professionally skeptical journalists.

macOS Big Sur, no iOS name change, zero new hardware and other last-minute WWDC rumors

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Big Sur
How does macOS Big Sur sound to you?
Photo: Diliff/Wikipedia CC

WWDC 2020 iOS 14 won’t be called iPhone OS and the new macOS will be called “Big Sur,” according to Apple tipster L0vetodream.

In a series of tweets early Monday, the Apple leaker shared a number of “predictions” that may spill details of the virtual-only Worldwide Developers Conference keynote Apple will Monday.

How to watch the WWDC 2020 keynote again [Updated]

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Tim Cook at WWDC on iPad
Are you ready?
Photo: Henry Ascroft/Apple

WWDC 2020 The upside to an online-only WWDC 2020 is that Apple is making its big keynote more accessible than ever this year. No matter where you are or what device you’re using, you should be able to tune in live.

The event kicks off at 10 a.m. Pacific today. Here are your options for watching the stream. (Update: If you missed the WWDC keynote, or simply want to watch it again, you can see it in the YouTube embed below.)

Tim Cook talks WWDC secrets, taxes, and how the iPhone could help people change the world

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Tim Cook talks to John Dickerson
Tim Cook's interview aired the day before WWDC.
Photo: CBS

Tim Cook talked taxes, WWDC secrets, and how the iPhone can play a small, but important role in changing the world for the better in an interview aired over the weekend on CBS Sunday Morning.

“I’m full of secrets and it’s hard not to overflow right now,” Cook said. “But I’ve been trained well.” On other topics, however, he was a lot more open.