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Judge Koh Rejects Bid For Secrecy In Apple Samsung Patent Case

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Could this be a result of patent infringement?
Too many secrets?

US District Court Judge Lucy Koh rejected requests today from both Apple and Samsung regarding the parties’ proposal to keep portions of key legal documents out of the public eye during their upcoming patent case in California this month.

If you’ve been following all the current pre-trial back and forth between Apple and Samsung in the Apple Inc v. Samsung Electronics Co Ltd et al, 11-1846 case, in which Apple has claimed Samsung is infringing on several patents, Samsung has counterclaimed similar infringement arguments, and Apple’s request for a temporary sales ban on the Samsung Nexus Phone has been accepted and enforced by the court.

You’ll also know that Judge Koh has been steadily, one might say doggedly, dealing with both parties, trying to keep the case as relevant, simple, and direct as possible.

Apple Proposes To Drop Claims On Galaxy Tab Injunction, Narrows Focus In Samsung Patent Case

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We do not agree. Neither do we.
Let's do this.

Apple and Samsung already narrowed the field of their California-based lawsuits against each other back in May of this year, pending a July 30 trial. Late yesterday, however, both parties filed a joint statement about narrowing the complaint field further in response to Judge Lucy Koh’s request they do so.

This makes perfect sense, especially when she already restricted their court time back in June. As Florian Mueller (FOSSPatents) points out, each of the large number of intellectual property (IP) arguments is already fairly complex. Trying to argue a ton of them at once would be unmanageable.

Apple, Samsung crush a troll’s hotspot patent

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A patent troll claimed to own the rights to the entire concept of a mobile hotspot. Not any more.

It’s not every day that Apple and Samsung can find grounds for cooperation, but even these arch rivals can agree about stomping on a patent troll.

The two companies managed to convince a federal court to rule invalid a patent related to mobile hotspots created by smartphones. The patent had been held by a company that only used it to sue other companies.

Samsung wants retrial in patent infringement lawsuit with Apple

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The Samsung patent infringement lawsuit isn't over, as the Android phone maker still tries to wiggle out of its punishment.
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

Last month, a jury ordered Samsung to pay Apple $539M for infringing on its patents. Now, the Korean company wants that decision thrown out.

It again says it should pay a far, far smaller amount for stealing many of the design elements of the iPhone.

Samsung must pay Apple $539 million for violating iPhone patents

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Samsung
Samsung argued it should pay just $28 million.
Photo: Jim Merithew/Cult of Mac

A jury has decided that Samsung must pay Apple $539 million in damages, following four days of deliberation — and years of ongoing legal battles.

The verdict is almost exactly in the middle of the $1 billion in damages Apple was requesting, and the $28 million Samsung’s lawyers felt the South Korean tech giant should pay.

Apple v. Samsung $1 billion patent lawsuit in the hands of a jury

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Apple and Samsung return to court
There's no doubt the design of the Galaxy S copies the iPhone. A jury will soon rule on damages in the Apple v Samsung patent lawsuit.
Photo: Killian Bell/Cult of Mac

The decade-long Apple v. Samsung patent-infringement trial is nearing its end. A jury is expected to announce Monday whether the premier Android-maker owes Apple $1 billion for copying the iPhone’s design.

Apple demands $1 billion from Samsung for patent infringement

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Apple and Samsung return to court
Apple and Samsung are battling it out again.
Photo: Killian Bell/Cult of Mac

Apple wants Samsung to cough up a whopping $1 billion in damages for infringing iPhone design patents.

The two companies again returned to court this week over the long-running dispute, which first began seven years ago. Apple told jurors that Samsung should hand over all the profit it made on four devices that were heavily inspired by the iPhone. Samsung’s lawyers disagree.

Supreme Court sides with Samsung in patent battle with Apple

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A U.S. Supreme Court ruling Tuesday brought relief to Samsung in its lawsuit with Apple over smartphone design patents.
A U.S. Supreme Court ruling Tuesday brought relief to Samsung in its lawsuit with Apple over smartphone design patents.
Illustration: Cult of Mac

The U.S. Supreme Court dealt a major blow to Apple Tuesday when it sided with Samsung in a smartphone patent battle that had the South Korean company staring at hundreds of millions of dollars in penalties.

In a unanimous ruling, the Court ruled a patent violator does not have to turn over all its profits from sales if the stolen design involved certain components and the not the entire device.

Samsung just tried to patent the Apple Watch

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Oh, Samsung!
Photo: Samsung

Ripping off Apple’s iconic designs is one thing, but Samsung just took its copying to a whole new level of stupid by trying to patent the Apple Watch.

Its new filing for a “Wearable Device” uses not one but many sketches of Apple’s popular smartwatch, complete with digital crown and all the same straps.

Apple says Samsung illegally won patent reversal

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Samsung
The Apple vs. Samsung legal case rages on.
Photo: Jim Merithew/Cult of Mac
The Apple vs. Samsung legal case rages on. Photo: Jim Merithew/Cult of Mac
The Apple vs. Samsung legal case rages on. Photo: Jim Merithew/Cult of Mac

The Samsung vs. Apple patent war has been raging for years now, but it took an interesting twist recently when a three-judge panel in federal appeals court reversed a $120 million jury verdict in favor of Apple.

The reason it’s interesting? Because, according to Apple at least, doing so was a violation of the U.S. Constitution.