For All Mankind grapples with the question of space crime [Apple TV+ review]

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For All Mankind review: Astronaut Ed Baldwin (played by Joel Kinnaman) still has his head in the clouds.
Astronaut Ed Baldwin (played by Joel Kinnaman) still has his head in the clouds.
Photo: Apple TV+

There are guns on the moon — repeat there are guns on the moon — in a new For All Mankind with a mildly elevated pulse! Everyone’s making hard choices and living with regrets on this week’s episode of no one’s favorite space soap on Apple TV+.

There’s fire inside and out in Dickinson’s season 2 finale [Apple TV+ review]

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Will Pullen as the ghost of Emily's future on this week's Dickinson
Will Pullen plays the ghost of Emily's future in the season 2 finale.
Photo: Apple TV+

Bad dreams, dead rebels, crumbling marriages, and new babies all collide in Dickinson’s season 2 finale.

The Apple TV+ show about the famous feminist legend of poetry needs to tie up a lot of loose ends. But it’s got to also leave enough left unanswered to entice viewers for next season. Can it accomplish all this on its own terms?

A superstar opens up in Billie Eilish: The World’s a Little Blurry [Apple TV+ review]

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Billie Eilish: The World’s A Little Blurry
She's young, she's human, get used to it.
Photo: Apple TV+

With Billie Eilish: The World’s a Little Blurry, the young pop star gets a showcase and a bio-doc, which means she’s gotten so hugely popular that people demanded to know more about her.

The good news is, Eilish is a humble and interesting subject. The bad news: Being a depressed teenager with high-tension demands placed upon you isn’t the easiest thing in the world.

Dueling tea parties and a looming civil war enliven Dickinson [Apple TV+ review]

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Dickinson review: Civil war is brewing in season 2.
A civil war is brewing.
Photo: Apple TV+

On this week’s episode of Apple TV+’s millennial melodrama Dickinson, Austin’s drowning, Emily’s flailing, Mrs. Dickinson’s catering two tea parties, and John Brown’s raiding Harper’s Ferry. And that’s just in the first few minutes.

The future hangs in the balance. And with only two episodes left in the show’s second season, every action and word counts. The show only wastes some of them.

Losing Alice gets kinky as the end draws near [Apple TV+ review]

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Alice, played by Ayelet Zurer, finally gains the upper hand this week.
Photo: Apple TV+

Losing Alice starts to wind down its look at the perverse triangle formed by a screenwriter, a director and their star in the Apple TV+ psychothriller’s penultimate episode.

The time has come for Alice to direct David and Sophie in their big, erotic close-up. Can they find the chemistry needed to sell it before the wheels come off the machine and Sophie is found out?

Emily becomes invisible in this week’s Dickinson [Apple TV+ review]

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Emily Dickinson (played by Hailee Steinfeld) gets published ... and disappears!
Emily Dickinson (played by Hailee Steinfeld) gets published ... and promptly disappears!
Photo: Apple TV+

Emily Dickinson is finally a published author, but will that stitch the tear in her heart or repair the fraying nerves of everyone in her orbit? Anyone who knows the story of the 19th-century poet knows the answer to that, but we’re not watching Apple TV+’s revisionist history for its accuracy, are we?

Losing Alice crawls toward a predictable conclusion [Apple TV+ review]

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Ayelet Zurer in Losing Alice
Ayelet Zurer plays Alice, and the audience is losing its patience.
Photo: Apple TV+

On this week’s episode of Losing Alice, the Apple TV+ limited series about a director matching wits with a hot young screenwriter, the titular filmmaker has a potential murderer on her hands. With her movie due to shoot any second, can Alice do the right thing and keep her job?

The bodies are piling up, and Alice is losing control of her star, her marriage, her movie and her life, just as the title implies. If only it were more exciting to watch.