Search results for: supreme court

Apple asks Supreme Court to support LGBTQ workers

By

Apple employees in Pride parade
Apple is asking the Supreme Court to protect LGTBQ people from workplace discrimination.
Photo: Apple

Apple is among more than 200 companies asking the Supreme Court to protect LGBTQ workers with current job non-discrimination laws.

The companies signed onto a “Friend of the Court” brief for three cases the high court is scheduled to hear this fall.

By

App store
Lawsuit could change Apple's relationship with App Store customers.
Photo: Apple

By

App Store monopoly lawsuit might make Supreme Court. This is the latest chapter in a long-running case involving Apple.
This is the latest chapter in a long-running case involving Apple.
Photo: Supermac1961/Flickr CC

Supreme Court deals a blow to Apple Pay

By

Apple Pay
When you use Apple Pay, you save the merchant money, But that's not something retailers can tell American Express users.
Photo: Apple

The Supreme Court handed down a number of high-profile rulings this week. One that didn’t get much attention will have a negative effect on Apple Pay.

The SCOTUS decided that retail store owners who accept American Express can not suggest to customers who bring out this card that they use another method of payment. That includes Apple Pay, even though this iPhone payment system would save the merchant money.

Supreme Court rules police need a search warrant to track your iPhone

By

Tower
Your wireless service provider always knows where your iPhone is, but police can no longer access that data without a search warrant.

The U.S. Supreme Court just handed down a victory for privacy advocates: police can no longer access mobile phone tracking data without a warrant.  

Wireless providers know which of its cell towers each of their customers is connected to, giving it a basic idea of where all of them are. Law enforcement agencies used to be able to obtain this data without permission from a judge.

Supreme Court ruling means online shopping could get pricier

By

iMac Pro
Buying products online may not remain significantly cheaper for long.
Photo: Apple/Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

If you buy your products online, you could soon find that they get a bit more expensive — due to a Supreme Court ruling that states can now require internet retailers to collect sales taxes. This decision ends 50 years of legal battles banning states from imposing sales taxes on purchases sold by out-of-state retailers.

“Our state is losing millions for education, health care and infrastructure, and our citizens are harmed by an uneven playing field,” said Marty Jackley, South Dakota’s attorney general, summing up the argument in favor of the decision.

By

apps wwdc screenshot
Developers suing Apple over the 30 percent App Store commission have to take their argument to the SCOTUS.
Photo: Apple

Apple backs transgender student in Supreme Court fight

By

Supreme Court plaintiff and LGBT rights advocate Gavin Grimm.
Apple is backing Supreme Court plaintiff and LGBT rights advocate Gavin Grimm.
Photo: Geoff Livingston/Flickr CC

Apple and dozens of other top tech companies filed a Supreme Court brief today in support of a transgender boy’s fight for equality.

In the case, Gavin Grimm, a transgender student from Virginia, is suing the Gloucester County School Board for creating a bathroom policy he says discriminates against transgender students by separating them from their peers.

Supreme Court sides with Samsung in patent battle with Apple

By

A U.S. Supreme Court ruling Tuesday brought relief to Samsung in its lawsuit with Apple over smartphone design patents.
A U.S. Supreme Court ruling Tuesday brought relief to Samsung in its lawsuit with Apple over smartphone design patents.
Illustration: Cult of Mac

The U.S. Supreme Court dealt a major blow to Apple Tuesday when it sided with Samsung in a smartphone patent battle that had the South Korean company staring at hundreds of millions of dollars in penalties.

In a unanimous ruling, the Court ruled a patent violator does not have to turn over all its profits from sales if the stolen design involved certain components and the not the entire device.

Apple vs Samsung patent battle has U.S. Supreme Court confused

By

Samsung
Apple vs Samsung is going all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court.
Photo: Jim Merithew/Cult of Mac

U.S. Supreme Court justices appear to be confused over how much Apple’s patented iPhone design should worth.

Lawyers for Apple and Samsung faced off this morning at the nation’s highest court. The two sides argued whether breaking a design patent should be worth most of a product’s profits, or if the thousands of other patents that go into a smartphone should be viewed as equally valuable to the contribution of profits.

Billions of dollars and the future of patent law is at stake in the case that hinges on a law written in 1887. But the justices didn’t give much indication which side they’ll take.

1 2 3 11