Huawei confirms it has had no contact with Apple over 5G chips

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Apple is worried Samsung may face production problems.
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Huawei says it has had no contact with Apple regarding the supply of 5G chips for a future iPhone lineup.

The Chinese smartphone-maker has previously stated it would be willing to work with its rival on a 5G iPhone. However, Apple has not been in touch — despite its struggle to obtain chips elsewhere.

Samsung and other smartphone makers are already rolling out devices with true 5G connectivity. The iPhone is yet to catch up, and if recent reports are to be believed, it’s going to take a while.

Apple has reportedly had trouble sourcing 5G chips for future devices. It could mean we’ll be waiting until 2021 (at the earliest) for the first 5G iPhone. But Apple does have options.

Apple’s struggle to deliver 5G

Intel’s supposed failure to deliver 5G chips on time is thought to be the primary reason for Apple’s struggle. It has resulted in an “increasingly stormy” relationship between the two companies.

Qualcomm, a former supplier of iPhone modems, has publicly stated that it is still prepared to supply Apple with 5G chips. However, thanks to an ongoing legal dispute, it seems unlikely Apple will take up that offer.

Huawei is the latest to have extended an olive branch. Ren Zhengfei, company founder and CEO, said last week that Huawei is “open” to selling 5G chips to Apple. But the company hasn’t yet held any talks with Cupertino.

Huawei confirms it hasn’t been talking to Apple

A Huawei representative confirmed at the Huawei Analyst Summit this week that there has been no communication with Apple whatsoever regarding its 5G chips.

Huawei believes Apple “is a great company and a pivotal company in the mobile industry,” according to analyst Anshel Sag. However, the two are yet to form any kind of partnership.

Apple is working on 5G chips of its own

In the not-so-distant future, Apple won’t need to rely on third-party 5G modems. The company is already hard at work on its very own chips that will grace iOS devices one day.

But this kind of thing doesn’t happen overnight, and unless Apple wants to be years behind the competition on 5G, it will need to find a supplier for the iPhone — and fast.