Laurene Powell Jobs is building Steve’s dream home

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Steve is finally getting his dream home.
Photo: Ben Stanfield/Flickr CC

Steve Jobs was such a perfectionist that, for years, he didn’t fill his house with furniture simply because he couldn’t find items that measured up to his high standards.

Which is why it is oddly fitting that only now — approaching five years after the former Apple CEO’s death — is work finally set to begin on building Steve Jobs’ dream family house on land he bought way back in 1984.

Some of the blueprints for the upcoming project.
Some of the blueprints for the upcoming project.
Photo: Town of Woodside

Jobs’ widow, Laurene Powell Jobs, is on track to win final approval from town officials in the upscale Woodside area of Silicon Valley to build the ambitious project. In doing so, she is continuing a long-term mission Steve pursued during the last decade of his life. He spent seven years fighting legal battles for the right to tear down a 17,250-square-foot mansion that stood on the land.

Steve Jobs' former mansion before he was able to tear it down.
Steve Jobs’ former mansion before he was able to tear it down.
Photo: Jonathan Haeber, Bearings

He was eventually granted permission to do so in February 2011, although Jobs’ pancreatic cancer meant the project never got any further than the demolition of the old 14-room house, with no new plans submitted.

So what will the Steve Jobs house look like?

The forthcoming Jobs family estate will total an impressive 15,689 square feet, and feature a large agricultural outdoor area of more than 9 acres for raising livestock, pressing olive oil, making wine and growing vegetables.

Plans describe a 3,706-square-foot main house, external yoga studio, sauna building, hot tub, plunge pool, swimming pool, two guest houses called the “Orchard House” and “Vineyard House,” wine press building, olive press building, large garden shed and barn.

There are also a few very Jobsian touches, such as the neat sliding glass doors shown below, which play on the thinly divided indoor/outdoor aesthetic that recalls architect Joseph Eichler, who had a big impact on Steve Jobs.

Neighbors will include SoftBank CEO Masayoshi Son, Sun Microsystems co-founder Andy Bechtolsheim, Intuit co-founder Scott Cook and Oracle CEO Larry Ellison.

Once construction starts, the entire project should take 596 days to come to fruition.

Source: VentureBeat