The Apple announcements that really got our hearts pumping

By

If you look closely you can actually pinpoint the exact moment the Apple Watch heart rate monitor stops working.
You can actually pinpoint the second when Apple announced a stylus.
Photo: The Simpsons, Twentieth Century Fox

We’ve seen Wednesday’s Apple keynote dissected every which way, but how about analyzing the moments where viewers’ heart rates jumped at the latest news from the Good Ship Cupertino?

That’s what the developers and beta testers of heart-monitoring Apple Watch app Cardiogram did, as they set their devices to workout mode for the anticipated event to find out what really tugged at their heart strings.

The results are … interesting.

Screen Shot 2015-09-11 at 11.12.26

It’s not exactly the most accurate measure of what people are talking about following the keynote. If sales equated to elevated heart rates, then watchOS 2 and the Apple Pencil would be the most talked-about things to come out of the keynote, while the new Apple TV would be in line to sell more than the iPhone 6s. None of which is true.

Still, it’s a fascinating glimpse into different types of data that can be gathered using devices like the Apple Watch. (You can check out full details over at Cardiogram’s website.)

Apple’s privacy policy stops a lot of this information from being gathered and mined for insights, but the fact that Cupertino’s devices make it possible to collect this data in the first place should bode well for building smarter devices in future.

Maybe this should be part of Apple’s sales pitch to the kind of artificial intelligence experts it’s apparently struggling to recruit right now.

When it’s not being used for monitoring Apple keynotes, Cardiogram is predominantly used for charting and analyzing the heart rate data in Apple’s Health app for people running and cycling. You can download Cardiogram for free in the App Store.

What made your heart race at Wednesday’s Apple media event? Leave your comments in the box below.

Via: TechCrunch