Woz: Apple’s Tax Practices Really Aren’t Fair

By

steve-wozniak

Apple has received a lot of heat from the U.S. Senate lately regarding its international tax practices and off-shore cash, and you can now add Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak to the list of Apple tax dissenters.

Woz said that he doesn’t think Apple’s tax practices are really fair, and suggested that Apple, and other large firms, be taxed on their income.

In an interview with the BBC, Woz had the following to say regarding Apple’s tax practices:

People are not taxed on profit, they are taxed on income, corporations should be taxed the same as people in my mind, that is how it should be, that would make things fair and right.

“That means corporations pay taxes on all of their revenues or people only pay it on a tiny amount called profit and until we rectify that the whole problem is just with us forever. That is why the rich get richer and the poor get poorer and I am always for the individual being much more important than their training, same reason I created the Apple computer at the start, it was to empower the little guy.

Tim Cook appeared before the U.S. Senate Sub-Committee Hearing to Examine Offshore Profit Shifting and Tax Avoidance by Apple Inc. in Washington, D.C. less than two weeks ago. During his testimony Cook pushed for a dramatic revision of the tax code to bring it up to speed for the digital age.

During his interview, Woz continued to rally against the way most people are taxed and professed his belief that individuals should be taxed on their profit, rather than their income.

“Why do businessmen get to write off lunches and cars? If normal people did they would have more savings.

“That is really not fair, that businesses are not treated the same as people.

“A person would say, ‘my life is my business and I have to pay for my home, pay for my clothes, my food and what is left over if I make a little money some year and put it in savings, that is my profit’, but people are not taxed on profit, they are taxed on income.”

 

Source: BBC