iOS 7 Reminds Us To Be Careful What We Wish For

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It’s our own fault. We all asked Apple to dramatically change the look and feel of the iOS operating system, which, until yesterday, remained largely unchanged since the introduction of the original iPhone back in 2007. And we all complained when it didn’t do that with iOS 6 this time last year.

But I can’t help but feel the Cupertino company is now punishing us for all those requests, and all that complaining we did before about its skeuomorphic designs.

When it comes to design, iOS 7 is vastly different to its predecessors. It still functions in much the same way — though there are some new features you’ll need to get used to — but it looks completely different. As soon as you power it up for the first time the minimalistic feel is staring back at you, but it isn’t until you’ve completed the setup process and arrived at your home screen that you want to vomit in your own lap.

Dark Sky For iOS Turns 3.0

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Dark Sky, our favorite micro-weather app for iOS, has just gotten a beautiful update to the big three-point-oh. Dark Sky’s just as simple as it ever was, but gives you a little more information about weather farther than an hour away, the ability to submit a personal weather support and meteorological data for our friends over in the U.K. Neat!

Fahrensius Is An Ultra-Simple Weather App For Your Mac’s Menubar

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Farensius is a simple menubar app for your Mac which will let you know what the weather is doing outside, should you be too busy to turn your head and steal an unproductive glance through the nearest window. You get a little icon showing you the type of weather you’ll find beyond the confines of your office, and a temperature in – yes – ˚F or ˚C.

WeatherPro Now Supports Your Own Netatmo Backyard Weather Station

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There are probably more slick-looking weahter apps in the app stoire than there are gimmicky to-do list managers, but if you want a meteorological powerhouse in your pocket then there’s only one option: WeatherPro. In it’s paid form it will give forecasts for up to two weeks, along with all the radar and satellite animations you could need, plus detailed yet easily-read weather info.

Now, if you own a backyard weather station from Netatmo, you can view its data right there in the familiar WeatherPro interface.