Apple officially loves new Steve Jobs bio, hated old one


Becoming Steve Jobs? More like Forgetting Walter Isaacson. Photo: Penguin Random House

You may have suspected that the new biography Becoming Steve Jobs had Apple’s official endorsement the moment it was revealed that Jony Ive, Tim Cook, Eddy Cue, Pixar’s John Lasseter and Jobs’ widow, Laurene Powell Jobs, offered their participation.

However, with just one day to go until the book’s release, the word is now officially out: This is Apple’s sanctioned version of the Steve Jobs story.

“After a long period of reflection following Steve’s death, we felt a sense of responsibility to say more about the Steve we knew,” Apple spokesman Steve Dowling said. “We decided to participate in [the] book because of [author Brent Schlender’s] long relationship with Steve, which gave him a unique perspective on Steve’s life. The book captures Steve better than anything else we’ve seen, and we are happy we decided to participate.”

Tim Cook offered Steve Jobs his liver, and other revelations from new biography


New biography Becoming Steve Jobs gets to the heart of Apple's mercurial co-founder. Photo: Ben Stanfield/Flickr CC

I can’t wait to read Becoming Steve Jobs: The Evolution of a Reckless Upstart into a Visionary Leader. The upcoming biography, by veteran reporters Brent Schlender and Rick Tetzeli, promises to be the definitive telling of Steve Jobs’ life.

The writers scored interviews with major players including Tim Cook, Jony Ive, Eddy Cue, Pixar’s John Lasseter, Disney CEO Bob Iger and Jobs’ widow, Laurene Powell Jobs. The result is a book loaded with interesting anecdotes and insights about the former Apple CEO.

I haven’t yet read the whole thing (it comes out March 24), but while pre-ordering my copy on Amazon, I could initially access a significant portion of the biography through the site’s “Look Inside the Book” feature. (Amazon later blocked out far more of the book’s contents.)

From what I’ve seen, some of the stories are pretty sensational — providing new details into the close relationship between Jobs and Cook, revealing Jobs’ secret plan to buy Yahoo!, and much more.

Want a few of the highlights? Check them out below.

It’s time to rewrite Apple history — with more Jony Ive


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It's time for Jony Ive to get the credit he deserves. Photo: Portfolio/Penguin

People are calling The New Yorker profile of Jony Ive the most important thing written about Apple in quite a while, and I’d have to concur.

Not only is it full of fascinating details, it puts Ive at the center of Apple, where he belongs. As the piece’s author, Ian Parker, writes: “More than ever, Ive is the company.”

This is something that’s been true for a couple decades, but still isn’t apparent to most people — even veteran Apple watchers. Such is the company’s secrecy, and the tendency of the public to equate everything Apple does with Steve Jobs, that the true story has yet to be told. Ive has not gotten the credit he deserves.

Both David Fincher and Walter Isaacson love Steve Jobs script


"You like me, they really like me!" Photo: Ben Stanfield/Flickr CC

Aaron Sorkin’s attempt to make Steve Jobs light up the big screen has been filled with disaster thanks to a rash of casting dropouts and production hold ups, but all the problems the movie’s facing can’t be blamed on Sorkin’s script.

Emails from Sony released by hackers this week reveal that pretty much anyone who’s read Sorkin’s Steve Jobs movie script has loved it. Steve Jobs biographer Walter Isaacson told Sony execs that he had a tear in his eye when finishing, and that the script is “totally awesome.”

Sorkin told Sony that shooting the film would be a breeze because the only locations they’d need are “two auditoriums, a restaurant and a garage.” Another email from Oscar-winning director David Fincher, who was originally signed on to direct Sorkin’s movie, gushes with positivity on the film that’s really more like a play.

Here’s what Fincher told Sony after reading the script in February:

8 great new tech books to make the winter months fly by



Read these tech books now. Thanks us later.

The evenings are getting darker and colder. It can only mean one thing: It's time to get some good books and settle in for the winter. But what to read?

Your humble bibliophiles at Cult of Mac can help. Combing through our bookshelves, we've assembled a list of the books you should make sure you pick up before 2014's out. Now get reading!

Photo: Christian Bucad/Flickr CC

The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution

Walter Isaacson’s new book might not be quite the monster hit that his 2011 Steve Jobs biography was, but The Innovators is definitely the 2014 tech book you’re most likely to spot someone reading on the bus. Having focused on one of tech's most singular visionaries, The Innovators turns its attention to teams of inventors and computer scientists, offering a look at just how far technology have come over the past century.

If The Innovators has a downside, it’s that it can be cursory in its discussions of specific people. Jobs got 500 pages of his own, but Vannevar Bush, Alan Turing, Doug Engelbart, Robert Noyce, Bill Gates, Tim Berners-Lee, Larry Page and others have to share less than that between them.

Still, if you’re looking for a tech book people will have read this winter, The Innovators should be high on your list.

Photo: Simon & Schuster

The Second Machine Age

To give it its full name, this is The Second Machine Age: Work, Progress, and Prosperity in a Time of Brilliant Technologies. It’s written by MIT academics Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee, and despite its title it’s not a book that focuses only on the positives of technology.

Taking in everything from Google’s self-driving cars to the possibility that we might one day be put out of a job by the right algorithm, The Second Machine Age looks forward while Isaacson’s The Innovators looks back. Between them, this as close to a crash-course overview of computing as you could hope for.

Photo: W.W. Norton & Company

To Save Everything, Click Here: The Folly of Technological Solutionism

Evgeny Morozov isn’t a critic to everyone’s liking. The guy’s got a shtick, and that shtick involves hating on technology in all its forms. His previous book, The Net Delusion, looked at how the Internet has progressed from a tool capable of freeing oppressed peoples to one used for controlling them. In his follow-up, To Save Everything, Click Here, he examines the subject of “solutionism” — or the idea that, in Apple’s words, whatever the problem, “there’s an app for that.”

Morozov is grouchy, offers few of his own solutions, and is able to take the most well-intentioned tech idea and twist it until it resembles a dystopian nightmare scenario. That doesn’t make To Save Everything, Click Here any less valuable, however. If you want your technology optimism grounded with a bit of critical theory, Morozov will give you plenty to think about.

Photo: PublicAffairs

Hatching Twitter: A True Story of Money, Power, Friendship, and Betrayal

Nick Bilton’s Twitter biography, Hatching Twitter, came out late last year, but it’s well worth a read if you haven’t got to it yet. It’s less heavyweight and more narrative than, say, Evgeny Morozov’s To Save Everything, Click Here, but that’s not to suggest in any way that it’s not worth your time. If you’re looking for a story in the vein of The Social Network (although infinitely better than the Ben Mezrich source material), this is certainly it.

Photo: Portfolio Penguin

How Google Works

Writing a book about Google is rapidly becoming a more oversubscribed area than writing about Apple. We’ve had histories from The New Yorker's Ken Auletta and Wired’s Steven Levy. We’ve had employee memoirs such as I'm Feeling Lucky: The Confessions of Google Employee Number 59. And we’ve had academic takedowns of googling, such as The Googlization of Everything (and Why We Should Worry) by Siva Vaidhyanathan.

What more could you possibly want to know about everyone’s favorite (or least favorite) Mountain View company? Answering that question is the thesis behind Eric Schmidt and Jonathan Rosenberg’s How Google Works. Instead of looking at what Google does, it looks at Google’s management as a company. The results can be problematic — when is Google not? — but the book is the best inside glimpse we’ve had yet.

Photo: Grand Central Publishing

The Quantum Moment: How Planck, Bohr, Einstein, and Heisenberg Taught Us to Love Uncertainty

The Quantum Moment isn’t strictly a tech book, but it’s one I very much enjoyed. It’s an informative and reassuringly accessible book that describes the nigh-unapproachable world of quantum physics.

Authors Robert P. Crease and Alfred Scharff Goldhaber take readers through the work of pioneering physicists such as Planck, Einstein and Bohr, and offer fresh and entertaining takes on concepts such as entanglement and the uncertainty principle without ever talking down to readers. If you’re interested in the science behind time travel and parallel worlds, this is highly recommended.

Photo: W.W. Norton & Company


It's Complicated: The Social Lives of Networked Teens

Author danah boyd (yes, it’s still styled like that) returns with It's Complicated: The Social Lives of Networked Teens, a fascinating new book about how teenagers communicate via social media. boyd looks at privacy, safety, danger and bullying in the age of Facebook and, while some of it is depressing stuff about trolls and misogyny, she also looks at the ways the online world can help alienated teens find new ways to engage and establish an identity. If you’re interested in the sociology of technology, this is definitely worth picking up.

Photo: Yale University Press

The Everything Store

Brad Stone's book The Everything Store: Jeff Bezos and the Age of Amazon got Bezos' wife to post an angry review online. Intrigued? Yes, you are.

Photo: Back Bay Books

The Formula: How Algorithms Solve all our Problems ... and Create More

Disclosure: Since this book is mine, I’m including it as a bonus book here, rather than one of the main eight. The Formula: How Algorithms Solve all our Problems ... and Create More is a book about algorithms and the increasing role they play in all our lives, from the way Google and Facebook shape our identities, to neural networks used by Hollywood to create hit movies, to the predictive policing increasingly used around the world. Take a look if you’re interested in the secret formulae that govern our lives.

Photo: Perigee