Is Your Mac Infected By The Flashback Trojan Affecting 600,000 Macs?

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This Apple's software is free from vulnerabilities? You couldn't be more wrong.
Your Mac could be one of the 600,000 infected by malware. Here's how to check.

A Mac infected by a virus used to be something of a rarity, and it was the best argument you could bring to a Mac versus PC debate. But with Mac adoption surging in recent years, it was inevitable that Apple’s operating system would become a target for hackers.

Variations of one Flashback trojan, which first surfaced back in 2007, are now affecting more than 600,000 Macs around the world. Here’s how to find out whether your machine’s affected and kill the malware.

Spies Can Officially Start Using iOS Says Australian Government

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Real-life Ethan Hunts have been officially approved to use an iPhone

We’ve already seen some pretty crazy uses of the iPad and iPhone in spy movies, but it looks like iOS is getting an official nod of approval as a mobile operating system worthy to be used in spy games. The Australian government just approved iPhones and iPads to be used for the storing and sharing of classified documents, meaning Ethan Hunt wannabes Down Under can look even more bad ass in their espionage attempts.

‘Flashback.G’ Trojan Is Infecting Macs With Older Java Runtime Software To Steal Your Personal Data

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Intego, the company behind the popular VirusBarrier security software for the Mac, has uncovered a new trojan horse called ‘Flashback.G’ that infects Macs running older versions of Java Runtime. The software installs itself on your system without your acknowledgement when you visit a malicious webpage, then it will record usernames and passwords for sites like Google, eBay, PayPal, and more.

Only 12 Hours Left On Our Discounted Deal For Internet Security Barrier X6 [Deals]

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There are only 12 hours left on the Mac Security suite, Internet Security Barrier X6 brought to you by Deals.CultofMac.

Mac usage has soared, and now hackers are targeting our brushed aluminum devices too. You’ve got your trojan viruses, macro worms, malware programs, and let’s not forget the good ol’ polymorphic virus! Another day in the Mac Jungle equals another chance of a cyber-thug trying to break down your stack with viruses, malware, worms, and trojans.

We’re very excited for the opportunity to offer you the best-in-breed virus protection software for Macs. Please do your homework: look it up, do a Google search – you’ll see that everyone says the same thing: “Internet Security Bundle X6 from Intego (which comes with a total of 5 virus-busting apps including the award-winning Virus Barrier X6) is the best virus protection for Mac. Period.”

F-Secure Releases Anti-Virus For Mac, But Do You Need It? [Review}

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image: ShiStock/deviantart.com

As any fan-boy (myself included) will testify, Macs don’t get viruses – or rather, that’s what we used to say…

With the popularity of the Macintosh platform at the highest it’s ever been, we are no longer as immune to cyber attacks as we could once claim. Only last week the ill intentioned ‘Mac Defender’ virus raged chaos on Macs the world over. The question of Mac security has raised its head once again – and this time, we might actually need to pay attention…

Safari Users Targeted By New ‘MACDefender’ Malware Software on Mac OS X

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A new malware threat called ‘MACDefender’ is targeting Mac OS X users browsing the web using Apple’s Safari browser. The software automatically downloads a file through JavaScript, but users must first agree to install the software, making the potential threat a low risk to careful users.

The malicious software was highlighted on Monday by Intego – the company behind the VirusBarrier X6 antivirus software for Mac – after Apple Support Community users started reporting the threat. Intego say the software prompts users to download a compressed ZIP archive after clicking on a dodgy link in their search engines. The file is then decompressed and begins installing MACDefender on the system.