Today in Apple history: iPod mini is ‘world’s smallest music player’

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Do you remember the iPod mini?
Photo: Apple

Feb20February 20, 2004: Apple goes small as the iPod mini arrives in Apple stores.

Released with 4GB of storage and in five colors, the diminutive iPod mini features a new “click wheel” that combines the control buttons integrated into a solid-state, touch-sensitive scroll wheel. If it’s size is small, however, its market potential certainly isn’t — as the iPod mini becomes the fastest-selling iPod up until that point.

Today in Apple history: Apple introduces ‘world’s fastest’ PowerBook

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Do you remember the PowerBook 3400?
Photo: Apple

Feb17February 17, 1997: Apple launches the PowerBook 3400, a laptop the company claims is the fastest portable computer in the world.

After a rough few years for the PowerBook, this model throws down the gauntlet to rivals, packing a PowerPC 603e processor capable of running at speeds up to 240 MHz, depending on which configuration you buy.

While it is quickly overtaken by speedier Apple laptops, at the time the PowerBook 3400 is able to match the speed of some impressive desktop Macs.

Today in Apple history: Pismo PowerBook is a multimedia powerhouse

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Do you remember the Pismo PowerBook?
Photo: CG Hughes/Flickr CC

Feb16February 16, 2000: Apple introduces the “Pismo” PowerBook, the best of its G3 laptops and, in the view of many, one of Apple’s best ever laptops.

The Pismo PowerBook is the first not to include the SCSI or Apple Desktop Bus (ADB) connector, and instead to opt for USB and Apple’s Emmy award-winning FireWire. Optional AirPort wireless support, tremendous battery life, and a gorgeous curvy design just makes it better.

Today in Apple history: Young Steve Jobs appears on Time cover

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TIME Magazine
Jobs' first big magazine cover.
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

Feb15February 15, 1982: Steve Jobs appears on the front cover of Time magazine for the first time, becoming the public face of successful tech entrepreneurship.

The first of many Time covers for Jobs, the article — titled “Striking It Rich: America’s Risk Takers” — casts him as the prototypical young upstart benefitting from the still-new personal computing revolution. It also identifies him as part of a surge of freshly minted millionaires running their own businesses.

Today in Apple history: Intel and Microsoft sued for stealing Apple code

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Apple v Microsoft
Apple vs. Microsoft was one of the big tech battles of the 1990s.
Photo: Brian Turner/Flickr CC/Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

Feb14February 14, 1995: Apple Computer extends a lawsuit against developer San Francisco Canyon Company to also include Microsoft and Intel. The lawsuit concerns code allegedly stolen from Apple used to improve Microsoft’s Video for Windows technology.

The lawsuit comes to a head with Apple threatening a multi-billion dollar lawsuit against Microsoft, while Microsoft CEO Bill Gates threatens to cancel Office for Mac.

Today in Apple history: Mac mania sweeps magazine racks

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InfoWorld
The Macintosh? It'll never catch on!
Photo: Cult of Mac/Ste Smith

Feb13February 13, 1984: The arrival of the first Macintosh is met with enormous amounts of excitement by the tech press, as seen by the Feb 13 edition of InfoWorld magazine.

Given the pre-internet lead time delay with the print media, it takes a few weeks after the January 24 release of the Macintosh for it to start appearing in magazines. When it does, it’s a pretty immediate hit.

Today in Apple history: Color Classic Mac ditches monochrome

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VintageMac
Do you remember the Macintosh Color Classic?
Photo: Chung Chu/Flickr CC

Feb10February 10, 1993: Apple launches the Macintosh Color Classic, its first color compact Apple Mac.

As the first desktop Mac to offer an integrated color display, and the last U.S. Mac to offer the compact form factor, this model represents a landmark in the evolution of the Macintosh. A Color Classic unit also happens to be the ten millionth Macintosh Apple shipped.

Today in Apple history: Steve Jobs’ NeXT quits making computers

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The NeXT Computer was great. It also didn't sell.
Photo: Rama & Musée Bolo/Wikipedia CC

Feb9February 9, 1993: NeXT Computers, the company Steve Jobs founded after being pushed out of Apple, quits making computers. The company changes its name to NeXT Software and focuses its efforts entirely on building software for other platforms.

In a mass layoff, 330 of NeXT’s 500 employees are made redundant in an event known internally as “Black Tuesday.” Cruelly, many people hear of their fate only after it is reported on the radio.

Today in Apple history: Steve Jobs flips out at iPad tweet

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The first-gen iPad in all its glory.
Photo: Apple

Feb8 February 8, 2010: Steve Jobs reportedly flips out over a tweet sent from an iPad by a Wall Street Journal editor

The reason? Because the iPad was being shown to the news outlet months ahead of its official release. While Jobs had already unveiled the device to the public, the suggestion that people outside Apple gained early access to the tablet was apparently enough to upset the CEO.

The tweet was rapidly deleted.

Today in Apple history: Steve Wozniak survives a plane crash

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The Woz tells it like it is.
Incident marked the beginning of a leave of absence for Woz.
Photo: Universal Pictures

Feb7 February 7, 1981: Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak is involved in a serious plane crash, resulting in his first lengthy leave of absence from the company.

At the time, Wozniak is flying a turbocharged single-engine, six-seat Beechcraft Bonanza A36TC. In the plane with Woz is his fiancé, Candi Clark, her brother and her brother’s girlfriend. Fortunately, nobody is killed in the crash, although Woz suffers minor head injuries.