Today in Apple history: Macintosh LC II is the Mac mini of its day

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The Macintosh LC II was more powerful and cheaper than its predecessor.
Photo: Jonathan Zufi

Mar23 March 23, 1992: The “headless” Macintosh LC II arrives, wooing value-oriented customers with a beguiling mix of updated internals and budget pricing.

Designed to take up minimal space underneath a monitor that was sold separately, the Mac LC II is destined to become a hit. In retrospect, the entry-level machine is roughly analogous to today’s Mac minis.

Today in Apple history: Twentieth Anniversary Mac lands with a thud

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The Twentieth Anniversary Mac launched twenty years ago today.
Photo: Apple

Mar20March 20, 1997: Apple launches its Twentieth Anniversary Macintosh, a futuristic special edition Mac that’s ahead of its time in every way.

Not part of any established Mac line, with a look (and price!) unlike anything available in 1997, the Twentieth Anniversary Macintosh unfortunately bombs at the marketplace. Today, it’s a collector’s piece.

Today in Apple history: Power Mac 7100 lands Apple in hot water with Carl Sagan

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Do you remember the Macintosh 7100?
Photo: Apple

March14 March 14, 1994: Apple introduces the Power Macintosh 7100, a midrange Mac that will become memorable for two reasons. The first is that it is among the first Macs to use the new PowerPC processors. The second is that it resulted in Apple getting taken to court by astronomer Carl Sagan — not once but twice.

Today in Apple history: Remember the Macintosh Portrait Display?

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An early Apple display experiment.
Photo: Computer.popcorn

March7March 7, 1989: Apple introduces the Macintosh Portrait Display, a 15-inch vertical grayscale monitor designed to show full pages on a single screen.

Intended for word processing and desktop publishing, the $1,099 monitor (plus $599 for an additional video card to run it) can be used by any Macintosh. Something of a rarity today, the Macintosh Portrait Display is an early example of the supersized displays Apple would release years later.

Today in Apple history: Here comes the Macintosh II

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The Mac II was an enormously impressive machine for its day.
The Mac II was an enormously impressive machine for its day.
Photo: Apple

March2March 2, 1987: Three years after releasing the original Macintosh 128K, Apple launches its direct sequel, the almighty Macintosh II.

Although there are already four Mac models released, the definitive, full-number name of the Macintosh II makes clear that this is a major computer in the series. With a massive hardware boost, optional color display (!) and a new open architecture, fans aren’t disappointed!

Today in Apple history: Card lets users run Apple II software on Macs

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Running Apple II programs on your Mac was pretty darn awesome.
Photo: Microwavemont/YouTube

March1 March 1, 1991: Apple introduces the Apple IIe Card, a $199 peripheral that lets users turn Macs into fully functioning Apple IIe computers.

The ability to emulate the popular Apple IIe computer on a Mac brings Apple’s two operating systems side by side for the first time. It’s not quite the equivalent of Apple letting you run iOS on a Mac today, but it’s not a world away, either.

Today in Apple history: Remember the ‘Flower Power’ and ‘Blue Dalmatian’ iMacs?

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These were two of the wackier Macs in history.
Photo: Apple

Feb22February 22, 2001: The iMac Special Edition, sporting custom Flower Power and Blue Dalmatian designs, puts a wacky face on the iMac G3 computer that saved Apple’s bacon at the turn of the century.

A far cry from the super-serious, aluminum-heavy industrial design that will come to define Apple, these colorfully patterned Macs are some of the most irreverent computers Cupertino ever dreamed up (c’mon, when was a real Dalmatian blue?).

Under the consciously tacky exterior hummed a pretty darn great Mac, though.

Today in Apple history: Apple introduces ‘world’s fastest’ PowerBook

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Do you remember the PowerBook 3400?
Photo: Apple

Feb17February 17, 1997: Apple launches the PowerBook 3400, a laptop the company claims is the fastest portable computer in the world.

After a rough few years for the PowerBook, this model throws down the gauntlet to rivals, packing a PowerPC 603e processor capable of running at speeds up to 240 MHz, depending on which configuration you buy.

While it is quickly overtaken by speedier Apple laptops, at the time the PowerBook 3400 is able to match the speed of some impressive desktop Macs.

Today in Apple history: Pismo PowerBook is a multimedia powerhouse

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Do you remember the Pismo PowerBook?
Photo: CG Hughes/Flickr CC

Feb16February 16, 2000: Apple introduces the “Pismo” PowerBook, the best of its G3 laptops and, in the view of many, one of Apple’s best ever laptops.

The Pismo PowerBook is the first not to include the SCSI or Apple Desktop Bus (ADB) connector, and instead to opt for USB and Apple’s Emmy award-winning FireWire. Optional AirPort wireless support, tremendous battery life, and a gorgeous curvy design just makes it better.