Today in Apple history: Apple shows off its amazing Fifth Avenue store

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Apple's stunning Fifth Avenue store.
Photo: Simone Lovati/Flickr CC

May18May 18, 2006: The world — and, more specifically, the Apple-watching press — gets its first glimpse at Apple’s swanky new Fifth Avenue Apple store in New York City.

Hidden behind black plastic wrapping during development, the covering is removed one day before the store’s grand opening — revealing a 32-foot glass cube adorned with a white, floating Apple logo. At 10am EST, members of the press get an exclusive tour of the new venue.

Today in Apple history: Apple reinvents the computer store

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Steve Jobs gives us a sneak peak at the first Apple store prior to its opening.
Photo: Apple

May15 May 15, 2001: Steve Jobs flips the script on the dreadful experience of computer shopping, unveiling an ambitious plan to open 25 innovative Apple stores across the United States.

The first two Apple stores, located at Tysons Corner in McLean, Virginia, and the Glendale Galleria in Glendale, California, are set to open later that week. But this is about much more than just a couple of retail outlets. It’s a radical reinvention of tech retail that will change the way computers get sold.

Today in Apple history: Bill Gates predicts doom for Apple’s biggest product

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Unfortunately for Gates, Steve Jobs was one step ahead.
Photo: 60 Minutes

May12May 12, 2005: Longtime Apple frenemy Bill Gates tells a German newspaper that Apple may have hit it big with the iPod, but that its success isn’t going to last forever.

The reason? Mobile phones are going to steal the iPod’s market share. The good news for Gates is that he was right on the money. The bad news for Microsoft is that Apple cannibalized itself by making the iPhone, which became even more successful than the iPod.

Today in Apple history: iTunes experiments with video downloads

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Morcheeba's "The Antidote" was one of the first music videos available on iTunes.
Photo: Morcheeba

May9 May 9, 2005: Apple quietly begins selling music videos in the iTunes Music Store.

The feature arrives with iTunes 4.8, initially offering bonus content for people purchasing albums through the store. It will take another several months before Apple starts selling individual music videos, along with Pixar short films and a selection of TV shows, for $1.99 a pop.

Today in Apple history: iTunes hits 1 million downloads in first week

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Were you a first week user of iTunes?
Photo: Apple

May5 May 5, 2003: Just a week after launching the iTunes Music Store, Apple reaches an incredible milestone with more than 1 million songs sold.

Particularly notable is the fact that more than half the songs purchased are albums, dispelling fears that selling tracks individually will kill the record industry’s dominant format. In addition, more than half the 200,000 songs initially available on iTunes get downloaded at least once.

It’s a roaring success for Apple’s newest venture!

Today in Apple history: iTunes puts the hurt on DVDs

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iTunes getting day-and-date releases for new movies was a big deal.
Photo: Apple

May1 May 1, 2008: The iTunes Store takes a gigantic step toward cinematic relevancy, selling new movies on the day of their DVD releases for the very first time.

“We’re thrilled to bring iTunes Store customers new films for purchase day-and-date with the DVD release,” Eddy Cue says. “We think movie fans will love being able to buy their favorites from major and independent studios.”

Movies out that week include Cloverfield, Juno, Alvin and the Chipmunks and American Gangster.

Today in Apple history: iTunes Music Store opens its doors

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The iTunes Store launched 14 years ago today.
Photo: Apple

April28 April 28, 2003: Apple opens the iTunes Music Store, revolutionizing the music industry and digital distribution of content.

At a time when getting music online mostly means illegal downloads from pirate services like Napster, iTunes quickly proves that customers will pay for songs, provided the service is good enough.

Today in Apple history: Psystar’s clone Macs go rogue

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After a battle with Apple over Mac clones, this T-shirt is all Psystar will be selling.
After a battle with Apple over Mac clones, this T-shirt is all Psystar will be selling.
Image: Psystar

April27 April 27, 2008: Psystar’s first Mac clones ship to customers. The new Open Computer means that, for the first time since the mid-1990s, there’s no need to assemble a “hackintosh” to run OS X on a non-Apple computer.

Unlike the last clone Macs, however, these low-priced computers don’t come with Cupertino’s blessing. Naturally, a fight ensues.

Today in Apple history: Early iPad rumor gets Apple fans buzzing

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According to the rumor, Apple was launching a 15-inch tablet.
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

April 13 April 13, 2005: The tech world gets excited when a sketchy rumor suggests Apple is building a tablet computer.

The Chinese-language report claims Quanta will build a 15-inch touchscreen tablet PC with detachable keyboard, which Apple will supposedly ship in the first quarter of 2006. Things don’t turn out quite like that, but the rumor offers the first hint about Apple’s secret iPad project.

Today in Apple history: Mac users can run Windows through Boot Camp

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Boot Camp finally allowed Macs to run Windows with ease.
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

April5April 5, 2006: Apple introduces the public beta of Boot Camp, software that allows users with an Intel-based Mac to run Windows XP in addition to macOS — or OS X as it was known at the time.

Boot Camp later officially makes its debut as a feature in Mac OS X “Leopard,” which debuts at Apple’s Worldwide Developer Conference (WWDC) a few month later in August.