Tekserve’s Apple artifacts wind up in Ukrainian museum

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MacPaw Apple museum

Photo: MacPaw

When legendary Mac repair shop Tekserve closed its doors last summer in New York City, Apple fans of a certain age experienced two deaths.

They bade goodbye to the original Genius Bar, technicians that had been servicing their devices for nearly 30 years. Those fans would also never again stare at Tekserve’s impressive Apple computer artifact collection, which was quickly auctioned off to an unknown bidder for $47,000.

The collection returned to a museum display today, more than 4,600 miles away in the Ukraine. Its new home is at the headquarters of software developer MacPaw.

Woz: In 2075, we’ll use iMacs on Mars

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The Woz has the magic touch with computers.
Woz demonstrating how to drive a spaceship.
Photo: Reddit

The future of Apple will be bright throughout the rest of this century, according to co-founder Steve Wozniak, who says he sees the company lasting well past 2075.

If the Apple legend is right, we’ll all be using iMacs on Mars before the end of the century.

The secret lives of iPhone factory workers, this week on The CultCast

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This week: an iPhone factory mole tells all.
This week: an iPhone factory mole tells all.

This week on The CultCast: Official new Nvidia drivers make your Mac compatible with the best GPUs on the market! Plus: A mole gives us our best look yet at what it’s really like to work in an iPhone factory; Apple’s working on a “breakthrough” diabetes treatment with the Apple Watch; and the saga of Ron Wayne, the forgotten Apple co-founder who traded his $22 billion of Apple stock for just $800.

Our thanks to Casper, maker of the internet’s favorite mattress, for supporting this episode. Learn why and save $50 off your order at casper.com/cultcast.

Today in Apple history: Apple co-founder quits and cashes in his stake for $800

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Ron Wayne: today, and when he co-founded Apple in 1976
Ron Wayne today and when he co-founded Apple in 1976.
Photo: Ron Wayne

April12 April 12, 1976: Apple’s third co-founder, a former Atari colleague of Steve Wozniak’s named Ron Wayne, cashes in his Apple shares for just $800.

Wayne, who owns a 10 percent stake in the company, throws in the towel after worrying that he doesn’t have the time or energy to properly invest in Apple. He later receives an extra $1,500 check to seal the deal. When he cashes it, he loses out on an investment worth billions.

Today in Apple history: Apple-1 starts a revolution

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Apple-1
The Apple-1 in all its glory!
Photo: Auction Team Breker

April11April 11, 1976: Apple releases its first computer, the Apple-1.

Designed and hand-built by Steve Wozniak, the computers are sold wholesale by “Steven” Jobs. To finance their manufacturing, Wozniak sells his HP-65 calculator for $500, while Jobs sells his VW van. Years later, in 2014, a working Apple-1 will sell at auction for $905,000.

Watch a rare Apple I power up like it’s 1976

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This is one of six Apple I computers in the world that actually work.
This is one of six Apple I computers in the world that actually work.
Photo: Victoria & Albert Museum/YouTube

Take a good look at that slim iPhone 7 in your hand, or the powerful MacBook Pro balanced on your knees. Then imagine the very first circuit board that flipped the switch to power a revolution that put those devices in your possession.

A video recently posted to YouTube by the Victoria & Albert Museum in London shows a working Apple I computer, one of only six known in the world today.

Rare Apple I might fetch $300,000 at auction

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The machine comes with an archive of original documents.
The machine comes with an archive of original documents.
Photo: Auction Team Breker

An Apple I may not be much use to you these days, but its significance in Apple history makes it one of the most valuable pieces of old technology.

Another rare Apple I, complete with an archive of original documents including the machine’s original user manual, will go to auction in Germany this May — and it’s expected to fetch up to $320,000.

Today in Apple history: Homebrew Computer Club meets for first time

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Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak make important connections at the Homebrew Computer Club.
Steve Jobs and Wozniak learned some valuable lessons at Homebrew.
Photo: Apple

March3 March 3, 1975: The Homebrew Computer Club, a hobbyist group that helps spark the personal computing revolution, holds it first meeting in Menlo Park, California.

A forum for computer geeks at a time when few others cared, regular attendee Steve Wozniak and his friend Steve Jobs will eventually show off the first Apple-1 unit at the club.

This retro photo shows how much Apple changed the face of Silicon Valley

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The site of Apple's spaceship campus back in 1961.
The site of Apple's spaceship campus back in 1961.
Photo: Santa Clara Public Library.

When Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak founded Apple way back in 1976, they had no idea how much their company would literally change the landscape of Silicon Valley, let alone the tech world.

Thanks to some old photographs of Cupertino, we can now see just how big of an imprint the Steves’ company has left behind.

Today in Apple history: Steve Wozniak survives a plane crash

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The Woz tells it like it is.
Incident marked the beginning of a leave of absence for Woz.
Photo: Universal Pictures

Feb7 February 7, 1981: Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak is involved in a serious plane crash, resulting in his first lengthy leave of absence from the company.

At the time, Wozniak is flying a turbocharged single-engine, six-seat Beechcraft Bonanza A36TC. In the plane with Woz is his fiancé, Candi Clark, her brother and her brother’s girlfriend. Fortunately, nobody is killed in the crash, although Woz suffers minor head injuries.