The real reason iPhone didn’t inherit iPod’s click-wheel UI

By

iPhonealternate
Yep, this is how the iPhone could have looked -- had project P1 taken off.
Photo: Apple

Former Apple VP Tony Fadell has dispelled the popular rumor that Apple had two rival teams working on different user interfaces for the first prototype iPhone.

Video of two prototype operating system builds for the original iPhone surfaced this week as Apple celebrated the iPhone’s 10th anniversary. One of the UIs proposed adopted the iPod’s click wheel interface and, according to Fadell, it actually worked really well.

There was just one problem: It sucked at making calls.

Apple’s spaceship campus gets closer to launch in latest drone vid

By

Landscaping on Apple's HQ is still underway.
Landscaping on Apple's HQ is still underway.
Photo: Matthew Roberts/YouTube

Cupertino has been soaked with rain the last few days which has made construction on Apple’s spaceship campus messy work in the latest drone video showing the headquarter’s progress.

Smaller structures are starting to take shape inside the infinite loop, while construction of the solar roof is about 65% complete. The first of hundreds of large trees have finally brought in as landscaping continues on the property. Crews have nearly finished burying the main tunnel to the parking lots which are now starting to be used.

Check out all the details:

New video shows iPhone prototypes going head-to-head

By

early-iPhone-prototype-UIs
Apple's earliest iOS prototypes.
Photo: Sonny Dickson

Apple calls iOS “the world’s most advanced mobile operating system,” but it was almost the world’s worst.

Before deciding on the icon-based user interface we know and love today, Apple designed an awful prototype UI that was based on the iPod’s software and controlled with a virtual click-wheel. Check it out in the video below.

Still using an original iPhone? We want to know.

By

img_0897
A shot of the battered original iPhone belonging to a member of the design team.
Photo: Leander Kahney/Cult of Mac

Next week marks 10 years since Steve Jobs unveiled the original iPhone, blowing our collective minds regarding the possibilities that smartphones presented.

Coming up on a decade later, if you’re still using the first-gen iPhone on a regular basis, we want to hear from you!

Today in Apple history: Stock ‘backdating’ scandal hits Steve Jobs

By

Steve_Jobs_2007
There was even some speculation Jobs could lose his, err, job.
Photo: Ben Stanfield/Flickr CC

Dec28December 28, 2006: As the rest of the country enjoys a much-deserved holiday, Apple gets embroiled in a stock “backdating” scandal.

The news, centered on the dubious awarding of stock options to Steve Jobs, prompts Apple share prices to fall. Some people even suggest Jobs might have to step down as Apple CEO. Fortunately, that doesn’t happen.

The weirdest Apple stories of 2016

By

Wierdest Stories 2016
It's been a weird year. And Apple's no exception.
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

2016 Year in Review Cult of Mac Covering Cupertino is more than just statistics and rumors about upcoming products. There’s plenty of weird Apple news, whether it be a Chinese billionaire buying iPhones for his pet dog or the revelation that, in some alternate universe, Tim Cook could become vice president of the United States.

With that in mind, here are the weirdest Apple news stories of 2016.

Today in Apple history: Apple invents ‘slide to unlock’

By

Apple didn't invent the Slide to Unlock gesture.
"Slide to unlock" drew audible gasps from the audience when Steve Jobs first showed it off.
Photo: Jared Earle/Flickr

Dec23 December 23, 2005: Apple files a patent application for its iconic “slide to unlock” gesture for the iPhone.

Although the iPhone is still a secret research project at the time, the ability to unlock the device by sliding your finger across it signifies everything Apple wants the iPhone to be: easy to use, intuitive and technologically miles ahead of the competition.

Today in Apple history: Apple brings back Jobs with NeXT buyout

By

8590665213_ff76c6ed8e_o
Steve Jobs pictured on December 20, 1996.
Photo: Tim Holmes/Flickr CC

Dec20December 20, 1996: Apple Computer officially buys NeXT, the computer company Steve Jobs founded after leaving Apple a decade earlier.

The deal costs Apple $429 million, a massive price to pay for the failing NeXT which has already seen its hardware division crash and burn.

The price is worth it when you consider what Apple gets as part of the deal, however: the return of Steve Jobs.