Apple engineer to give behind the scenes look at iOS 10 security

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Apple will only collect iOS 10 data if you opt-in.
iOS 10's security secrets will be revealed at Black Hat Conference.
Photo: Apple

In an unprecedented talk, Apple plans to give the world an in-depth look at the security features on iOS 10 at the Black Hat USA 2016 conference where hundreds of the top computer security professionals from around the world will gather.

The keynote will be given by Apple Engineer Ivan Krstic who will give technical details about three iOS security mechanisms, including the new Auto Unlock feature that is brand new in iOS 10.

Snowden’s iPhone case tells you when you’re being spied on

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Edward Snowden is building his own iPhone case.
Photo: PubPub

When you think of Edward Snowden the first phrase your mind goes to probably isn’t “quality iPhone case manufacturer.” Nonetheless, the famed NSA whistleblower today announced that he has presented just such a smartphone accessory at an event at MIT’s Media Lab.

Anyone want to venture a guess as to the case’s unique selling point?

Pokémon Go update fixes Google security issues

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Pokemon GO
It's now safe to catch 'em all.
Photo: Niantic Labs

Catching Pokémon on your iPhone just got a lot safer thanks to the first-ever update to Pokémon Go.

Developer Niantic Labs pushed out a fix today that resolves the security issue that gave Pokémon Go full access to some players’ Google accounts without their knowledge, or providing a way to revoke access without losing progress in the game.

Pokémon Go catches all your Google data (here’s how to stop it)

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Pokémon Go comes with monstrous security risks.
Pokémon Go comes with monstrous security risks.
Photo: The Pokemon Company

Pokémon hunters that have been running around the city trying to catch ’em all are putting themselves in danger and it has nothing to do with battling a level 50 Charizard.

By signing up to play Pokémon Go through Google, many iOS users have unknowingly exposed all of their emails, chats, calendars, documents and more to the game’s developer and third-parties.

Dangerous new Mac malware fully compromises OS X

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Bitdefender
Bitdefender found a new backdoor into OS X.
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

Apple’s Mac systems have been exposed to a dangerous new piece of malware that allows attackers to take full control of OS X.

The new malware, dubbed Backdoor.MAC.Eleanor by security researchers, provides attackers with a backdoor into OS X systems by embedding a script into a fake file converter application that’s found on many reputable sites that sell Mac apps.

Apple winning as lawmakers give up on forced backdoors

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iPhone SE
The FBI won't get its backdoor anytime soon.
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

U.S. lawmakers are said to be giving up on their push for new encryption laws that would require companies like Apple to create software backdoors that allow the government to access our devices.

It’s thought the lack of White House support and Apple’s high-profile battle with the Justice Department, which was unable to force the company into providing an iPhone unlock, are some of the reasons why supporters are losing hope.

iOS 9 security update means more passcode unlocks

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There has to be a safer solution.
It's not just in your head.
Photo: Jim Merithew/Cult of Mac

If you’ve found yourself entering your passcode more frequently since you updated to iOS 9 — even though you have Touch ID enabled — it’s thanks to Apple’s latest security measures.

In an update to its Security Guide, published this month, the company confirms that iOS 9 will make you enter your passcode if you haven’t used your iPhone or iPad in at least eight hours.

Apple products subject to secretive Chinese security reviews

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china-defends-its-new-anti-encryption-law-image-cultofandroidcomwp-contentuploads201512Screen-Shot-2015-12-23-at-164347-png
The Chinese government is snooping on Apple devices.
Photo: Apple

Chinese authorities are scrutinizing Apple devices before allowing them to be sold in the country, claims a new report.

The reviews involve Chinese officials requiring executives of foreign tech companies to answer questions in person, with the concern being that companies like Apple may be forced to trade trade secrets for market access.