FBI cracks San Bernardino iPhone without Apple’s help

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That iPhone in your pocket is much more well-traveled than you are.
The FBI didn't need Apple's help after all.
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

The Department of Justice has removed all legal action against Apple after the FBI successfully hacked the San Bernardino terrorist’s iPhone without assistance from Cupertino.

Apple and the FBI have been fighting a very public legal battle over whether the government can force the iPhone-maker to create a backdoor into iOS. Apple CEO Tim Cook publicly defied a federal court order to deliberately weaken iOS security for millions of users, but it appears that the feds are backing down — at least for now.

Malware uses Apple’s FairPlay DRM to attack iOS users

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Hackers are now using FairPlay system itself to gain access to iOS devices.
Hackers are now using FairPlay system itself to gain access to iOS devices.
Photo: Colin / Wikimedia Commons

Researchers have just discovered a new malware threat for iOS devices that uses Apple’s own FairPlay DRM system as a delivery vector.

Dubbed “AceDeciever” by the researchers, the malware in question can technically infect any type of iOS device, jailbroken or not, if a user downloads a third-party app.

Apple’s new 4-inch iPhone, killer Netflix tips, the FBI fight, and more

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What's next? We've got some ideas.
What's next? We've got some ideas.
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

If the rumor mill is correct, Apple’s releasing a new 4-inch iPhone, possibly dubbed the iPhone SE, at its upcoming keynote in March. What the heck will it look like, what are the specs, and how much will it cost?

We’ve got a look at all the possibilities in this week’s Cult of Mac Magazine, plus a look at why your iPhone battery will never last more than a day, Apple’s cryptic “loop you in” invite, a way to lock down your iPhone, and a ton of killer tips and product reviews to keep you informed.

All that, plus a bunch more, in this week’s issue. Here are the top stories for the week:

Adobe rushes out yet another security patch for Flash

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Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more.
Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more.
Photo: Adobe

In a post that surprises no one in the tech community, Adobe needed to fix another Flash security flaw today, rushing out a patch for its web multimedia software.

Adobe is rating the update as a critical vulnerability “that could potentially allow an attacker to take control of the affected system.”

Which, of course, sounds like kind of a big deal. Time for yet another security patch for Flash.

DOJ accuses Apple of deliberately making iPhone unhackable (no duh)

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Apple wants to keep everyone (even the feds) out of iOS.
Apple wants to keep everyone (even the feds) out of iOS.
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

The U.S. Department of Justice has filed a new motion in court today regarding its battle against Apple to compel the iPhone-maker to unlock the iPhone 5c that belonged to San Bernardino shooter Syed Rizwan Farook.

In the new filing the feds argue that Apple has “deliberately raised technological barriers” on iOS to make it harder for the government and other attackers to hack Apple devices. They also claim that demanding Apple to unlock one iPhone won’t result in a security vulnerability for all users.