Grandfather scammed out of $50,000 in iTunes scam

By

money
Police say they want to stop others being scammed in the same way.
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

An almost 90-year-old grandfather was recently scammed out of $50,000 in iTunes vouchers, police detectives have revealed.

Calling the scam artists “the lowest of the low,” Detective Mike Oakley says that the victim received a call on May 3 from a person pretending to be his grandson and saying they had been involved in a serious car accident during a vacation in Florida.

Asked for iTunes gift cards to pay IRS bill? Yep, that’s a scam

By

itunesgiftcard
Crazily enough, you can't pay your taxes in iTunes gift cards.
Photo: Apple

Florida police in Port St. Lucie are warning people of a new scam that asks for iTunes vouchers as payment for money apparently owed to the Internal Revenue Service.

While such a thing sounds like something no-one would fall for, it has already apparently duped one unfortunate man into buying an iTunes card worth $2,300 at his local Target store.

iPhone owners plagued by another iCloud phishing scam

By

icloud_fake
Watch out for messages like this!
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

iPhone owners in the U.K. have complained about being targeted with a phishing scam trying to trick them into revealing personal information by claiming that there is a problem with their iCloud account.

The scam message appears to come from an official Apple account called “iSupport,” and says that specific iCloud accounts have been deactivated and that users should head to an external website to confirm their user details and “reactivate [their] account.”

Cheap iPad Air turns out to be piece of tin with Apple sticker

By

Get one of these bad boys, and then some free gift card money to boot!
This is what a real iPad Air 2 looks like. Needless to say, this isn't what was being sold.
Photo: Photo: Jim Merithew/Cult of Mac

A video has gone viral online showing a man complaining after ordering a cheap iPad Air 2 online for $100 — only to discover that it is actually an overpriced piece of tin, complete with a printed iPad home screen on the front, and Apple sticker on the reverse.

What is it that they say about offers which appear too good to be true? You can check out the video below.

Surprise! $80 iPad lacks key features (like, all of them)

By

Photo: Apple
This is what happens when you pay $80 for an iPad in a parking lot.
Photo: Apple

Do you know the difference between a tablet and a tile? If so, then there’s a good chance that you wouldn’t be the target of a scammer in Victorville, California, who this week duped an unsuspecting woman out of $80 by selling her what she thought to be an iPad mini 3.

In the worst plot twist this side of a modern M. Night Shyamalan movie, the “iPad” turned out not to be an iPad at all, but rather a piece of tile in an iPad box.

Florida man allegedly scammed Apple Stores out of $309,768 in products

By

Apple is heading toward a $1 trillion market cap. Photo: Pierre Marcel/Flickr CC
Photo: Jürgen Ulbrich, Apfellike

Most Apple Store thieves we’ve seen prefer to go with the classic smash and grab technique, but according to federal court charges, one fraudster in Florida broke his Apple heist into 42 separate scams by using a simple but major flaw in Apple’s credit card processing system to plunder $309,768 worth of products from Apple’s retail locations.

Sorry Scammers, But You Can’t Bait And Switch iOS App Screenshots Anymore, Says Apple

By

iPhone Apps

Apple announced on its developer site today that it will be locking down the images submitted along with apps once they are approved for the App Store, locking scammers out of one more tactic used to scam naive app buyers into purchasing apps that may look just like popular games (like Pokemon or Minecraft). The tactic involved submitting apps with basic images for approval to Apple, then switching them out to infringing images that look just like the popular apps.

Apple’s new policy should help cut down on scammer app sellers from deploying the bait and switch maneuver in the future, helping keep app buyers a bit safer than before.