All items tagged with "research"

Apple Spends Just 2% Of Its Revenue On R&D

Collaboration

Despite a budgetary increase of 32% from $3.381 billion in 2012 to $4.475 billion in 2013, Apple still spends less than 3% of its revenue (net sales total $170.91 billion so far this year) on Research & Development of new products: something that will surely give ammunition to those skeptics who claim less innovation is taking place under Tim Cook’s command than it ever did while Steve Jobs was at Apple’s helm.

Right?

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The iPhone 5s Is Outselling The iPhone 5c Two To One [Report]

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While the iPhone 5s is still difficult to get hold of more than three weeks after its debut — particularly if you want a gold or silver model — you shouldn’t have any problem picking up an iPhone 5c at your local Apple store. That’s because the cheaper device isn’t selling anywhere near as much as its high-end sibling.

According to new research from Consumer Intelligence Research Partners (CIRP), the iPhone 5s is currently outselling the iPhone 5c more than two to one.

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Researchers Sneak Malicious iOS App Into The App Store Undetected

jekyll

Researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology have successfully found a way to sneak malicious iOS apps past Apple’s strict App Store review process that is designed to prevent such software from making its way onto our devices.

The technique used a seemingly innocent app called “Jekyll” that could be updated after approval to carry out harmful actions without triggering security alarms.

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19% Of Consumers Say They’ll Buy The “iWatch” Before It’s Even Announced

iWatch_perspective

A new survey conducted by ChangeWave Research has found that 19% of U.S. consumers say they’re likely to purchase Apple’s much-anticipated “iWatch” if and when it becomes available. The demand has been attributed to “Apple’s track record of delivering ultra-convenient, easy to use products with perceived ‘cool factor’.”

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Meet The Bride Of Macenstein: Ms. Mac 2012, The “Average” Mac User [Image]

Meet The Bride Of Macenstein: Ms. Mac 2012, The “Average” Mac User [Image]

If you sliced apart the average Mac user into separate parts and pieced her together, Frankenstein-style, what would you get? According to research from BlueStacks, the average Mac user is probably an American woman with freckles, long black hair, wearing a t-shirt and sneakers.

“We’ve created a monster,” said BlueStacks marketing VP John Gargiulo. “But she is a very cute monster.”

Sounds like my kind of girl. Sadly, she’s also probably seeing someone already. Sorry, fellas.

Liquid Helps Information Flow Smoothly [Review]

Liquid Helps Information Flow Smoothly [Review]

Copy text and act on it

Liquid is a productivity helper for OS X. It comes in two flavors – free and paid. The idea is to speed up your information seeking workflow. You find something you need to research, and a few key presses later you’ve got some data. Or a unit conversion. Or, in the paid version, a language translation. It’s got a lot of features.

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New From Microsoft: Multitouch In Mid-Air

New From Microsoft: Multitouch In Mid-Air

Wave your hands in the air like you just don’t care

Researchers in the UK have put together a prototype wrist-worn sensor that turns your own hand into a 3D movement controller for almost any device you can think of.

Experts from Newcastle University and the Cambridge-based Microsoft Research used off-the-shelf parts to assemble a sensor that straps to your wrist and detects movement of your arm, hand and fingers. There’s no need for any external sensor, nor for line-of-sight to the device you’re controlling. Everything’s done using the technology you wear.

Here’s a video that explains more.

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How Super Algorithms Will Make Future iPhones & iPads Charge Twice As Fast

How Super Algorithms Will Make Future iPhones & iPads Charge Twice As Fast

Plug in your iPhone or iPad and charge it up, and you’ll notice that while the first 80% or so will go by pretty fast, they actually kind of suck at charging up that last 20%, taking a lot more time to do so than it feels like they should.

There’s a reason for this. Charging batteries up to “full” is a complicated process. There’s no real way to tell if a battery is completely “full” so all you can do is measure the voltage, which (and this is a vast simplification) tells you how much resistance is being met when you try to put more electricity into the battery.

That’s why it takes so long for an iPhone to charge that last 20%. It charges full blast until it measures a certain voltage, then goes into what’s called “trickle mode” to slowly allow small sips of electricity into the battery until it thinks, based upon some software calculations, that the battery is more or less full. But a new algotihm could make the time it takes to charge your iPhone or iPad go by a lot faster.

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Science Explains Why We Mourned For Steve Jobs

Science Explains Why We Mourned For Steve Jobs

Dr. Andrew K. Przybylski tries to explain why we all mourned Steve Jobs’s death.

Most of us never had the opportunity to meet Steve Jobs, but as Apple fans and users, we knew a lot about the company’s co-founder and former CEO. Even though we didn’t know him personally, we all felt an immense sense of loss when Jobs passed away last October.

In an effort to try to understand why Jobs’s death had such an affect on his fans, Dr. Andrew K. Przybylski from the University of Essex has conducted a three-part study that looks at how we felt connected to Jobs though his devices.

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Hong Kong, Not America, Has More iPads Per Person Than Any Other Country

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We’re all aware of how popular Apple’s tablet is. It spawns endless lines outside of Apple stores for days after its launch, and it no other tablet is anywhere close to being as successful. Apple’s iPad is so popular in fact, that one in six Hong Kong citizens own the device.

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