Liam can’t recycle every iPhone, even with 29 arms

liam-apple-recycle-robot
Apple's new robot, Liam, is a recycling machine, but so are we...
Photo: Apple/YouTube

Liam, Apple’s robot that deconstructs iPhones to mine the valuable resources inside them, is certainly cool — but he’s still not the recycling machine we deserve (or need).

Just like any Apple product, Liam was designed to work well. But how much good does the robot, which took three years to develop and build, actually do?

Get extra Earth Day cash when you trade in your Apple gear

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Doesn't get much better than getting paid to help the Earth...
Doesn't get much better than getting paid to help the Earth...
Photo: Pixabay

Today is Earth Day. That’s good news for the environment — and great news for your wallet!

To celebrate, we’re offering an extra $10 for every product sold on our gadget buyback program through the end of the weekend. Just use the promo code “earthday” when you get your quote and you’ll grab the extra green.

Apple Stores will ditch plastic bags for paper this month

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Am I the only one who dislikes Apple Store bags?
Goodbye, old friend!
Photo: hellosanta1225

As part of Apple’s continued focus on the environment, Apple Stores will soon ditch their instantly recognizable plastic bags for new paper ones made of 80 percent recycled materials.

The official changeover happens April 15, although stores will continue to use the old plastic bags until they run out of stock. The new bags come in both medium and large sizes.

In Ghana, the global problem of e-waste has local consequences

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Loads of mobile phones end up in Ghana, where they may or may not be recycled properly.
Loads of mobile phones end up in Ghana, where they may or may not be recycled properly.
Photo: Agbogbloshie Makerspace Platform/Flickr CC

Consumers have a nasty habit of throwing out their electronics as soon as newer, shinier models become available, and they rarely ever do so properly. Nearly 42 million tons of e-waste — everything from microwaves and electric shavers to washing machines, laptops, cellphones, TVs and computer monitors — entered the global garbage stream in 2014, according to a United Nations University report.

Like all trash, this stuff doesn’t just disappear. Instead, it stacks up in landfills. Unlike most trash, however, e-waste is often packed with valuable components — as well as toxic chemicals and materials that can cause real damage wherever they end up.