Hundreds of iOS apps secretly collect users’ data

By

appstore
Does Apple need to double up on its security measures for new apps?
Photo: PhotoAtelier/Flickr

A security firm claims to have discovered 256 apps that illicitly gather user email addresses, lists of installed apps, serial numbers and other identifying information.

Apple may be obsessed with user privacy, but these apps — which violate App Store policy and have been downloaded by an estimated 1 million people — somehow got by Cupertino’s gatekeepers.

Tim Cook: Apple isn’t interested in sharing your data

By

Apple CEO Tim Cook.
Tim Cook is a privacy advocate.
Photo: Jim Merithew/Cult of Mac

Tim Cook participated in a recent interview with NPR’s Robert Siegel, in which he reiterates Apple’s stance on user privacy, discusses what it would take for Apple to bring its overseas cash pile back into the U.S. — and comically avoids talking about the Apple Car.

You can listen to it below.

Apple reveals just how seriously it takes your privacy

By

Screen Shot 2015-09-29 at 10.08.54
A motto to live by.
Photo: Apple

Apple has updated its website with new details about about its privacy policy and how it uses customer data.

Under the heading “The most personal technology must also be the most private,” the site runs down all of Apple’s core services, and explains how Apple protects user data in each case.

Here are some of the highlights:

Create your own private disappearing chatroom with hack.chat

By

Now you can chat in your own private, disposable room in seconds.
Now you can chat in your own private, disposable room in seconds.
Photo: hack.chat

There are a dozen-odd ways to chat with people these days, from IM to Twitter direct messages to apps like Slack, Snapchat and GroupMe.

If you want to create your own with no more fuss than typing in a unique URL in your web browser, though, you can’t go wrong with hack.chat, a new, bare-bones, no-frills approach to private chat that looks like something out of the DOS era. And I mean that in a good way.

It’s dead simple to use (though you can also run your own server) and incredibly disposable. Perfect for those quick chats you need to make happen that you may not want on something like Slack, which keeps an archive of all the inappropriate comments you’ve ever written.