U.N. backs Apple, calls encryption fundamental to freedom

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Your iPhone will always need to be recharged everyday.
Security isn't a feature, it's a right.
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

The United Nations is standing behind Apple in the company’s fight against the FBI over whether the federal government can compel the iPhone-maker to create a backdoor into iOS.

In a letter written in support of Apple’s case, U.N. Special Rapporteur David Kaye says that if the feds are successful, it would infringe on citizens’ right to freedom of expression.

Watch Apple’s House Judiciary Committee appearance right here

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Apple's General Counsel, Bruce Sewell.
Apple's General Counsel, Bruce Sewell.
Photo: 60 Minutes

Apple’s top lawyer is set to appear before the House Judiciary Committee today to discuss balancing Americans’ security and privacy, in light of the company’s ongoing battle with the FBI, which has demanded the company unlock the San Bernardino terrorist’s iPhone.

Apple gave us a glimpse of general counsel Bruce Sewell’s opening remarks yesterday. Apple’s lawyer will ask congressional representatives some tough questions on privacy, but we won’t know what the committee thinks until the hearing gets underway later this morning. A livestream of the event will be available on YouTube when the hearing starts at 10 a.m. Pacific.

You can watch it below:

Here’s what Apple’s top lawyer will tell Congress tomorrow

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Tim Cook
Tim Cook and Apple aren't backing down.
Photo: Jim Merithew/Cult of Mac

Apple’s general counsel Bruce Sewell is set to appear before the House Judiciary Committee tomorrow, when he’ll go toe-to-toe with FBI Director James Comey over whether the bureau should be allowed to force Apple to create a backdoor into iOS.

Tim Cook already explained Apple’s argument against the FBI’s orders, but today the company revealed what will be Sewell’s opening remarks before Congress unloads a barrage of questions — and he’s got some pretty big questions of his own for lawmakers to consider.

Legendary investor Warren Buffett tells Apple: ‘Privacy has its limits’

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There's still a lot of money left in iOS devices.
Warren Buffett thinks Apple should help the FBI.
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

Legendary investor Warren Buffett says Apple should help the FBI crack the iPhone at the center of the San Bernardino shooting case because “privacy has its limits.”

Speaking to CNBC Monday, Buffett said he’s not siding against Apple — although he kind of is.

Apple files official refusal to create ‘GovtOS’

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govtos
We doubt we'll see this at any WWDC keynotes. At least, we hope we won't.
Photo: Evan Killham/Cult of Mac

Apple has officially asked a judge to dismiss a court order requiring the company to unlock a terrorist’s iPhone at the FBI’s request.

We knew the legal filing was coming, but now we have the actual defenses Apple is using to defend its refusal to create what it calls a “GovtOS” that would let officials potentially bypass the security measures of millions of iPhones. The 65-page document released today details Apple’s history of assistance in the case — and the reasons it believes the original order is both bothersome and possibly illegal.