The classic Holga camera finally goes digital

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The Holga, a favored toy camera of artists and photographers, will have a digital model thanks to Kickstarter.
The Holga, a favored toy camera of artists and photographers, will have a digital model thanks to Kickstarter.
Photo: Holga

I have three Holga cameras sitting in a box with at least one still loaded with film. Plastic and unpredictable, the low-fi aesthetic makes portraits and landscapes look dreamy and from another time.

But film isn’t as easy or as cheap to develop, scan and print as it once was, so many photographers like me have watched the dust build up on these cameras while hoping a digital alternative would come along so we could relive the surprise and magic in a Holga picture.

The Hong Kong company that has been making Holga cameras since 1981 now has a digital offspring available on Kickstarter.

Kickstarter project puts cameras in the hands of London’s homeless

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The cover of the 2016 calendar called My London photographed by homeless artists.
The cover of the 2016 calendar called My London photographed by homeless artists.
Photo: ROL

David Tovey became homeless on the streets of London after a stroke and found salvation in an unlikely place – a disposable camera.

Tovey was invited to participate in an art project giving Londoners cameras to record life on the streets for a calendar now being sold on Kickstarter. He has had photos selected for the Cafe Art calendar project two years in a row.

Send your photos to a select few with XY Share It

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The XY Share It lets you transmit photos to only those you want looking at them.
The XY Share It lets you transmit photos to only those you want looking at them.
Photo: XY

You have a great picture of your kid on their first day of school and you would like to share it with just two people. You could post to Facebook or Instagram, but then everyone sees it. You could attach it to an email or text or you could just pass the phone over the next time you see them.

The company XY has another option. It has designed a Bluetooth device the size of a keychain that lets you share an album of pictures with select people.

We’ve found 6 products that’ll turn your photography from faux to pro [Deals]

The Lytro is the first consumer lightfield camera, turning photos into living moments to be explored
The Lytro is the first consumer lightfield camera, turning photos into living moments to be explored
Photo: Cult of Mac Deals

Everyone’s a photographer these days, or at least that’s what people would have you believe. Making images that have impact takes more than a camera-phone — it takes special gear, knowledge, and skill with photographic hardware and software. We’ve got all those bases cover with these six deals, from lenses to lessons, cutting-edge cameras and powerful photo apps. Check them out now — these deals might disappear before you can say ‘cheese’.

These trailblazers took selfies before selfies were a thing

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Robert Cornelius made photography history with the first known self-portrait taken in 1839.
Robert Cornelius made photography history with the first known self-portrait taken in 1839.
Photo: Library of Congress

There was no selfie stick, no hashtags and no sharing with his BFF. In fact, when Robert Cornelius took his historic selfie, he sat still as a stone for 15 minutes, then watched the photo slowly appear on a silver-plated sheet of copper as he breathed in dangerous mercury fumes.

That was instant gratification in 1839.

Cornelius, using a wooden box fitted with an opera glass, likely deserves credit for taking the world’s first selfie. He didn’t make the picture out of vanity, but as an experiment to test a silver-plating method for the daguerreotype photographic process, which had been introduced worldwide just three months before Cornelius’ self-portrait.