How to make sure your iPhone fireworks photos go off with a bang

These tips will help you take better fireworks photos.
These tips will help you take better fireworks photos.
Photo: Richard Dongses/Flickr CC

Last year’s Fourth of July fireworks made you say ooh and ahh, but when you look at your iPhone photos from that night, the sound you make is more of an ugh.

Don’t blame Siri or some engineer in Cupertino. The iPhone camera, as mighty as it is, can’t do all the thinking for you, especially in challenging lighting conditions like a fireworks display. But with a little thought and preparation, you can make this holiday one worth reliving on your iPhone camera roll.

Below are some simple tips to make your fireworks photos sizzle.

Apple’s Shot on iPhone ads get bold dash of color

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Shot on iPhone ads at a subway in Sydney.
Shot on iPhone ads at a subway in Sydney.
Photo: Apple

After going all in on football, Apple’s Shot on iPhone ad campaign is taking a new direction with a series of colorful new ads across the globe.

The new Shot on iPhone campaign called “Colors” has some of the most artsy billboards ever that focus on big bright colors. Only instead of featuring images from photographers around the world, the new ads highlight local photography shot near where the ads have been posted.

Take a look:

Apple camera system could fix the most annoying thing about concerts

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Concert photography could soon be banned.
Concert photography could soon be banned.
Photo: Vanja Terzic/Pexels

Nothing is worse at concerts than having some dude block your view of the band for 45 minutes to take crappy iPhone pics. But those days may be coming to an end soon thanks to Apple.

The company was recently granted a patent that would allow concerts and other private events to block iPhone users from taking photos and videos of the event by using infrared signals.