Bill Graham Civic hosted Apple’s biggest hyperbole-fest ever

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The iPhone 6s Plus might be hard to find on launch day.
All Apple's saying is that the iPhone 6s will be the most amazing, dynamic, life-changing thing you've ever seen.
Photo: Apple

We get that yesterday’s Apple event was a marketing thing, which is why every presentation began with whoever was onstage telling us how “thrilled,” “excited” or “really happy” they were to be there. And the exaggeration just continued from those intros.

Here are some of the most outlandish and enthusiastically subjective lines that came from the stage at the Bill Graham Civic Auditorium. We’ve organized them by speaker so you can see who “won” this verbal arms race of canned excitement.

Apple: Making 3D Touch was really, really hard

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Force Touch was only the beginning. 3D Touch was incredibly difficult to engineer.
Force Touch was only the beginning. 3D Touch was incredibly difficult to engineer.
Photo: Apple

Making an iPhone is complex, for sure. Creating the hardware and software that rules our daily lives has been an ongoing, iterative process since 2007, when Steve Jobs revealed the first one.

Since then and on up to the newly announced iPhone 6s and 6s Plus, the iPhone itself has improved bit by bit while still wowing consumers as better enough to upgrade to.

“You can’t just say, ‘Here it is. It does the same thing 5 percent better than last year,’ says senior vice president of worldwide marketing Phil Schiller in an interview over at Bloomberg. “Nobody cares.”

In a device that’s the essence of complexity, refined, the new 3D Touch was super tricky to make, as the in-depth interview explains.

All the ways Apple left us hanging at WWDC 2015

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Tim Cook announces “one more thing” at WWDC 2015.
They probably shouldn't have stopped at one.
Photo: Apple

Apple’s two-hours-plus keynote at its Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) this week was packed with new and exciting information about the future of software for its current major hardware. But we couldn’t help but notice some things that were missing.

Here are some of the ways Apple’s presentation left us hanging this year.

Phil Schiller explains 16GB iPhones, MacBooks with one USB port, design vs. battery life

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Phil Schiller answers some of our biggest questions about Apple products.
Phil Schiller answers some of our biggest questions about Apple products.
Photo: Apple

Why does the latest iPhone still ship with just 16GB of storage as standard? Why does the new MacBook have only one USB port? Why does Apple make devices thinner and thinner rather than adding bigger batteries?

At Apple’s Worldwide Developers Conference in San Francisco this week, marketing chief Phil Schiller sat down with The Talk Show to address some of these questions.