Apple Watch could use heart rate sensor to ID you


The Apple Watch will monitor your pulse, speed and pace; but there's no sensor to measure how much weight you can lift.
Your pulse may one day unlock your Apple Watch.
Photo: Jim Merithew/Cult of Mac

Future versions of the Apple Watch may be able to identify owners just by taking their pulse.

Apple was awarded a patent this week that details the use of biometrics on a smartwatch that can identify the user based on their heart rate and other variables. All without the users having to make any input.

More proof Apple wants to embed Touch ID sensors in iPhone display


Apple's fingerprint scanner is experiencing a Touch of bother. Photo: Apple
No more of this, apparently.
Photo: Apple

After switching to a Taptic Touch ID sensor for the iPhone 7, Apple is strongly rumored to be eliminating a physical “Home” button altogether for next year’s iPhone 8 — and instead integrating Touch ID fingerprint sensors into the main display.

Now a newly-published patent appears to back up that rumor, with the stated goal of expanding screen real estate by avoiding, “assigning valuable surface space exclusively to a component that may only be used briefly during the process of identifying the user.”

Apple invents laser-mapping tech for controlling your Mac


An officer worker flips through screens on his computer with Reemo gesture technology. Photo; Reemo/YouTube
How gesture-tracking tech could work.
Photo: Reemo/YouTube

Future Apple devices could be controlled using gaze tracking or point gestures, claims a newly-published patent, describing Apple’s investigations into 3D depth-mapping technology.

The technology would build on the kind of 3D depth-mapping tech being used in the new dual lens iPhone 7, but would apply this to new ways for users to interface with their iMac or, possibly, Apple TV by using in-air gestures or eye-tracking to navigate on-screen menus and content.

Touch ID could record prints to catch iPhone thieves


Sorry, crooks!
Photo: Apple

Everyone points and laughs when dimwitted thieves got caught after taking identifying selfies with stolen iPhones or iPads.

However, in its quest to help crack down on Apple-related crime, Apple may go even further by using its Touch ID fingerprint sensor to record the fingerprints of would-be iOS thieves — at least according to a newly-published patent application update.