Websites Start Enabling Safari Push Notifications Ahead Of OS X Mavericks Release

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In OS X Mavericks, websites will be able to send you push notifications in Notification Center. This means, for example, that every time Cult of Mac publishes a new article, you could get a notification through Mavericks.

Sounds potentially maddening to me, but some big names are coming on board, with NBA.com and The New York Times enabling push notifications on their sites.

The New York Times Will Let You Use Gestures To Read The News With Leap Motion

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Leap Motion is a futuristic, Minority Report-like desktop platform that uses physical gestures to interact with apps. The hardware controller has been delayed a couple times, but it is finally scheduled to ship alongside a dedicated app store on July 22nd.

All kinds of content creators are working on integrating Leap Motion into their apps, including The New York Times. The American publication will offer a “Top News” app for Leap Motion customers that uses hand gestures to browse and read articles.

Get New Logos, Website Redesigns, And More With 99designs [Deals]

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CoM - 99designs

So you’re starting a new venture in 2013. Need a new logo for it? What about getting that web design dealt with so you can launch your first website? Perhaps it’s time to finally consider styling up your business cards?

Whatever your design needs may be, why limit yourself to one designer when you can tap into the talent of hundreds of talented artists? That’s what 99designs offers – and Cult of Mac Deals has an offer that lets you get $50 of high quality design services for only $25!

NYT: Apple Is Making Good Progress With Foxconn Working Conditions Overseas [Report]

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Apple CEO Tim Cook spent time with Foxconn employees during his visit to China earlier this year.
Tim Cook spent time with Foxconn employees during his visit to China earlier this year.

The New York Times raised quite a stink at the beginning of this year with its provocative ‘iEconomy’ series on the poor working conditions at Foxconn, Apple’s largest manufacturing partner in China. After running headlines like “In China, human costs are built into an iPad,” the Times has published a new report that more positively portrays Apple’s recent efforts to improve working conditions in the supply chain.

After the mainstream media turned its attention to Apple and Foxconn, the Fair Labor Association (FLA) got involved to help ensure quality factory life for Chinese workers. For years, Apple has also been performing detailed audits of over 800 facilities where parts for its products are made and assembled. The Cupertino company has been beefing up its requirements in order to set the bar even higher in the supply chain. All of the combined efforts have resulted in better overall working conditions and pay raises for Foxconn employees. But that doesn’t mean there’s no more progress to be made.

NYT: Apple To Release iPad Mini This Year, Will Cost “Significantly Less” Than Current iPad

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Will we see more iPad mini components as production ramps up?
Will we see more iPad mini components as production ramps up?

Following numerous sources like iMore, Digitimes, MacotakaraBloomberg and The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times now reports that Apple is planning to launch a 7.85-inch iPad this year. In a ploy “to lure customers who want different sizes of tablets into the iPad product family,” the smaller device will cost “significantly less” than the current iPad Apple starts at $499.

Study Finds No One Cares About NYT Story Saying Apple Dodged Billions In Taxes

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Well, duh. Apple is just way cooler than GE in the first place.
Well, duh. Apple is just way cooler than GE in the first place.

The New York Times published a story recently that attacks Apple for avoiding billions of tax dollars every year, but does it matter in the court of public perception?  A new study says that Apple’s reputation score in the aftermath of the report remains relatively unscathed. Compare this to General Electric (GE), a company also reported to be avoiding paying their fair share of taxes. GE’s score dropped considerably in the same amount of time after a similar New York Times story on them last month.

Compared to GE? Apple’s Teflon.

The Truth About Apple’s Taxes

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Apple's taxes due and tax rate for 2011 don't match reported numbers
Apple's taxes due and tax rate for 2011 don't match reported numbers

Earlier in this day, we reported on a New York Times piece in which the paper claimed that Apple was using a variety of measure to avoid paying U.S. income tax. It turns out that the Times based key pieces of its information on a study that had been discredited two weeks prior.

The data used by the Times included a report by the Greenlining Institute, which made errors in computing Apple’s supposed tax rate at 9.8% for the 2011. The data used by the report effectively compared Apple’s 2011 profit with taxes paid by the company for profits in 2010 and drew unfounded conclusions as a result.

Apple Fails In Defending Its Tax Practices

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Apple fails in defended its tax practices
Apple fails when it comes to defending its tax practices

Over the weekend, the New York Times ran another in its series of exposes about Apple. This one focused on Apple’s complex mix of offices and subsidiaries located throughout the world and the U.S. that allow the company to keep large portions of its more than $100 billion in low-tax states and countries.

The report comes after the paper’s expose on working conditions within Foxconn, the contractor that Apple uses to assemble most of its products and calls by politicians and members of the media for Apple to move more of its manufacturing and money to American soil.

iOS Loophole Allows Developers To Secretly Upload All Of Your Photos To Their Servers

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Over the last few weeks, third-party iOS developers received a lot of heavy venom from the Internet after reports surfaced that apps are accessing users’ address book information without users’ permission. It appears that the situation is worse than first thought and that apps can access more than just address books without notifying users. Photos on iOS devices are also susceptible to apps once a user has granted an app permission to their location information.