New Logitech Ultrathin Touch Mouse Makes Me Want To Lick The Screen

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logitech-ultrathin-touch-mouse

It’s been a while since a mouse had me licking my MacBook’s screen with gadget lust, but a few seconds after first looking at Logitech’s new Bluetooth-powered Ultrathin Touch Mouse T630 and my rMBP’s glossy panel was covered with a thick coat of saliva. (Seriously, doesn’t anyone else lick their screen? Am I the only one?*)

Make Your Mac’s Mouse Cursor Huge And Never Lose Track Of It Again [OS X Tips]

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Obviously, not a Retina display, but you can't get that big mouse cursor into a screenshot.
Obviously, not a Retina display, but you can't get that big mouse cursor into a screenshot.

You ever do that thing where you have to move your mouse around, jiggling the little thing just to find the dang cursor? I do it all the time these days, with my smaller screen Macbook Air and the Mac Mini that’s connected to the HDTV across the room from me, since there’s so much going on onscreen that I often lose track of it.

There’s an easy way to fix this problem, and it involves the Accessibility options that come built right in to your Mac OS X system.

Shortcat Might Just Mean You Never Touch Your Mac’s Mouse Again

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One of the things that was fantastic about vintage PCs is the way your hands never had to leave the keyboard: everything was just a command away. The graphic user interface first introduced to the world with the Macintosh is obviously a big step forward when it comes to general accessibility, pointing an onscreen at an object to click on it can often be a step backwards when it comes to speed for die-hard power users.

If that sounds like you, Shortcat is a new, free app that you should download which aims to bring the command line to the GUI.

Logitech Cube Mouse: For Starters, It’s a Flipping Cuboid [Review]

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logitech-cube-1

Boy, can press releases be deceptive. When we recieved the email and photos from Logitech earlier this year unveiling the outfit’s cool new mouse/presentation device, we had the impression the little brick was much bigger than it actually is. In fact, the $70, wireless Cube is tiny — so tiny that it almost seems designed for the hands of a five-year-old.