iPads Used To Record Health Data Deliver Significant Improvements In Cancer Care

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iPads at Duke cancer clinics lead to more accurate medical histories and symptom tracking.
iPads at Duke cancer clinics lead to more accurate medical histories and symptom tracking.

The iPad has become a fixture in healthcare that simplifies the lives of doctors and nurses. It turns out that the iPad can improve the quality of care patients receive if it is used as a mechanism to record a patient’s medical history and/or as a way of monitoring that patient’s progress on follow-up visits.

The iPhone Is The New Doctor’s Housecall

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New trends show health-related apps are changing how patients experience healthcare.
New trends show health-related apps are changing how patients experience healthcare.

Health related iOS apps are proliferating quickly in the App Store. While the most popular health related apps tend to be focused on diet, exercise, and stress relief, there are some other fast growing trends that show how the iPhone and iPad transforming the healthcare experience for consumers.

According to MobiHealthNews, which provides an annual assessment of the market for mobile apps related to medicine, health, and fitness, three new trends are emerging that could significantly reshape our experience of healthcare.

Dissection App Lets You Cut Up Virtual Dead Bodies

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Budding serial killers can now practice their craft without harming innocent household pets.

 

“Welcome to the ultimate virtual cadaver dissection experience!” So begins the pitch on McGraw-Hill’s Anatomy & Physiology REVEALED app for the iPad, a teaching app which overlays photos of real dead people onto rendered models of the underlying gristle.

How The iPhone Is Revolutionizing Nursing

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Nurses embrace iPhones/smartphones for somewhat different uses than doctors.
Nurses embrace iPhones/smartphones for somewhat different uses than doctors.

When it comes to talking about iOS devices in healthcare, most of think of doctors carrying iPads the way that they used to carry lengthy paper charts or clipboards. We think about doctors looking at X-rays and other diagnostic tests on an iPad, perhaps even using the iPad to illustrate a broken bone, illness, or surgical procedure.

Doctors, however, aren’t the only healthcare professionals to be embracing mobile technology. A new study shows that the vast majority of nurses have also embraced mobile devices, particularly the iPhone and other smartphones. It also highlights that differing needs of healthcare professionals when it comes to mobile technology.

Why Your Doctor Doesn’t Want You Using iPhone And iPad Health Apps

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Doctors are concerned about how mobile health apps and tech may empower patients
Doctors are concerned about how mobile health apps and tech may empower patients.

Doctors may be fans of the iPad as a clinical tool, but they’re not certain that Apple’s iPad, the 5000+ health and medical apps in the App Store, or other mobile technologies are safe and effective health tools for patients. That’s the gist of a report by PwC Global Healthcare. The report was based on surveys of physicians, healthcare management professionals and payers, and mobile technology users in ten countries around the world.

According to the report, just under two-thirds (64%) of healthcare providers acknowledged that mobile technologies offer potential benefits for patients, but feel that mobile health (also known as mhealth) is virgin and untested territory. As a result, the majority of doctors (73%) don’t suggest iOS or mobile health apps to their patients and some (13%) even discourage patients from using them.

Griffin Launches iPad Case Designed Specifically For Doctors

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Griffin's AirStrap Med case makes the iPad more physician-friendly
Griffin's AirStrap Med case makes the iPad more physician-friendly

The iPad has been popular with doctors and healthcare providers since it debuted two years ago. In fact, the iPad’s form factor and capabilities are almost tailor-made for many common and emerging uses in medicine like electronic health records, medical and drug reference guides, and even remote diagnosis using FaceTime.

With hospitals rolling out iPad deployments and many physicians in private practice buying them, it was only a matter of time before healthcare-specific iPad accessories hit the market. Griffin Technologies is one of the first companies to focus on making the iPad an even better fit for doctors, nurses, and other healthcare professionals with a new case that’s designed specifically for medical environments.

The Difference Between A Mac And PC Could Kill You In Medical Imaging

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Never mind Touch ID, this could be the best way of unlocking future phones.
This brain scan is measured differently on Mac and PC.

A team of researchers have discovered that the software used to analyze images of the brain gives significantly different results depending on whether it’s used on a Mac or PC. It means the measurements gathered on one machine can be up to 15% different than those gathered on another — using exactly the same images — which is a serious issue that medical professionals and developers need to fix… fast.

Griffin AirStrap Med Protects Doctors’ iPads From Blood and Gore

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This case shrugs off any and all bodily fluids.

The iPad might seem to be the ideal tool for medical professionals — lightweight, always connected, reliable and with an all-day battery. But none of that will help you if you slip with a scalpel and suddenly have a gusher on your hands, or someone evacuates the contents of their ungrateful stomach all over your tablet.

What you need, doctor, is Griffin’s new AirStrap Mad.

MIT Video Tech Could Turn iPhones Into Real Life Tricorders

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Imagine that you could just point your iPhone’s camera at your baby and it would immediately tell you his vital signs: heartbeat and so on. Or that you could fire up an app and it could pick out tiny, invisible movements from what looks like a still video. Using a process called Eulerian Video Magnification, boffins at MIT are doing this already.

Are iPads And iPhones Too Distracting For Doctors?

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iPads offer lots of advantages to doctors but they can also provide lots of distractions
iPads offer lots of advantages to doctors but they can also provide lots of distractions

Since the day the original iPad was announced more than two years ago, there’s been a constant discussion about its use in healthcare. At face value, the iPad offers a lot of tools to doctors and other healthcare professionals like access to electronic medical records (EMRs), access to electronic prescribing systems, and access to a wealth of reference materials like medication guides. To some extent the same benefits are available from the iPhone and other smartphones.

Those seem like great additions to a doctor’s daily workflows – both in the office and while on rounds at hospitals. Those great healthcare features don’t live in a vacuum, however. They live on mobile devices that also allow their owners to check-in on social networks, send and receive texts and emails, play games, and do all manner of personal tasks. That has some doctors and hospitals concerned that iPad, iPhones, and other mobile devices could actually be putting patients in harm’s way.