New Mac malware targets Microsoft Word users

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Mac-macro-malware
Beware bogus Word macros.
Screenshot: Patrick Wardle.

After spreading viruses among Windows PCs for years, malicious Microsoft Word documents are now infecting Macs.

The files contain a macro that silently executes in the background and downloads an application that can monitor webcams, steal passwords, read browser history and more.

Apple’s big event, iPhone 7 leaks and rumors, malware and more

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What's coming down the pike?
What's coming down the pike?
Photo: Stephen Smith/Cult of Mac

Apple’s set to bring the noise at an exciting new keynote event March 21, full of iPad Air 3 and iPhone SE news, and we’re sure you’re ready to hear it.

While you wait for Apple’s big event, though, we’ve gathered together all the things we think you need to know about the upcoming Apple-fest and put them into this week’s Cult of Mac Magazine.

Enjoy the noise, and check out this week’s top stories.

Malware uses Apple’s FairPlay DRM to attack iOS users

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Hackers are now using FairPlay system itself to gain access to iOS devices.
Hackers are now using FairPlay system itself to gain access to iOS devices.
Photo: Colin / Wikimedia Commons

Researchers have just discovered a new malware threat for iOS devices that uses Apple’s own FairPlay DRM system as a delivery vector.

Dubbed “AceDeciever” by the researchers, the malware in question can technically infect any type of iOS device, jailbroken or not, if a user downloads a third-party app.

Thinner iPhones, Mac malware and 10 mobile Safari tips you need to know

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Thin is in, baby.
Thin is in, baby.
Cover Design: Stephen Smith/Cult of Mac

With Bendgate not that far behind us, is it really wise for Apple to contemplate an even thinner iPhone?

Sure, it’s an easy selling point for new iPhones, but thinner can also mean more bendable. Take a look at this age-old Apple theme in this week’s Cult of Mac Magazine, along with 10 fantastically useful mobile Safari tips, a way to find out if you’ve been infected by sneaky adware, five amazingly great new iOS games, and some awesome product reviews to help inform your purchasing plans.

All this, and much much more, in Cult of Mac Magazine, free for your perusal right now.

Here are the top stories of the week:

How to eliminate the adware that’s plaguing your Mac

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Don't get caught like this.
Don't get caught like this.
Photo: Stephen Smith/Cult of Mac

In addition to various viruses that can harm your Mac, there’s a different kind of annoyance you might have stumbled upon: adware.

This might manifest itself as a web page that tells you you’ve been infected, with an accompanying phone number to call or malicious website to visit, or it might even show up as an ostensibly helpful Mac app you don’t remember installing.

If you’re experiencing the pain of malicious adware, we’re here to help. Here’s how to eliminate the adware that’s plaguing your Mac.

Find out if you’ve been infected by sneaky new Mac malware

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Have you been infected?
Have you been infected?
Photo: Marcin Nowak/Unsplash

Is your Mac infected by newly discovered malware that was ostensibly created by Milan-based HackingTeam in order to gain remote access to your machine?

The new virus uses some old HackingTeam code and some new tricks to hide its tracks, but it’s mostly harmless, according to researchers.

That doesn’t mean it’s not a good idea to get it off your system. Here’s how.

Apple takes steps to avoid a repeat of XcodeGhost debacle

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Double-check that you're using the right version of Xcode to build apps.
Apple will provide Chinese users with a local official version of Xcode to download.
Photo: Johan Larrson/Flickr

Apple is taking steps to avoid a repeat of this week’s serious XcodeGhost incident — in which hundreds of App Store apps were discovered to include malware in the form of a counterfeit version of Xcode, the platform used by developers to build their apps.

A great reason not to jailbreak your iPhone

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Screen-Shot-2014-11-30-at-12.14.54-PM
More and more jailbreak software, such as Pangu, has come from China.
Screenshot: John Brownlee/Cult of Mac

If you enjoy customizing your iPhone, jailbreaking can be a positive thing — although that doesn’t mean it comes without risks.

According to a new report, around 225,000 Apple accounts have been stolen by malware on jailbroken iPhones, in what is claimed to be “one of the largest known thefts of its kind.” In some cases, this data was then used to make unauthorized purchases.

Yikes!