Today in Apple history: iMac G5 takes a page out of the iPod’s playbook

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The iMac G5 looked like the world's biggest iPod.
Photo: Matthew Pearce/Flickr CC

Aug 31August 31, 2004: Apple launches the iMac G5, its distinctive all-in-one white plastic iMac which resembles the world’s biggest iPod music player.

Housed in a 2-inch thick enclosure reminiscent of Apple’s Cinema Displays, the iMac G5 bridges the gap between the pleasing plasticity of the iconic G3 iMac and the minimalist form factor of today’s ultra-slim aluminum Mac desktops.

Today in Apple history: Meet the ‘world-saving’ PowerBook 5300

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The top-spec PowerBook 5300 remains the priciest laptop in Apple history.
Photo: Cult of Mac

Aug25August 25, 1995: Apple releases the PowerBook 5300, the same Mac laptop which saves the world from alien invaders in the 1996 blockbuster movie Independence Day.

And makes a whole lot more big-screen appearances too, for that matter…

Today in Apple history: Mac marketing guru Joanna Hoffman is born

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Kate Winslet (left) plays Joanna Hoffman (right) in Steve Jobs.
Kate Winslet (left) played Joanna Hoffman (right) in last year's Steve Jobs movie.
Photo: Kate Winslet/Apple

27July 27, 1955: Joanna Hoffman, a marketing executive who was part of the original Macintosh and NeXT team — as well as Steve Jobs’ first right-hand woman — is born in Poland.

Six months younger than Jobs, Hoffman (who was played by Kate Winslet in last year’s Steve Jobs movie) is one of the few people willing and able to stand up to the oftentimes-fierce Apple co-founder during the first part of his career.

Today in Apple history: Steve Jobs visits the Soviet Union

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This was Steve Jobs' one and only trip to the Soviet Union.
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

Monday4July 4, 1985: Steve Jobs visits Moscow for the one and only time, with the aim of selling Macs to the Russians.

During a two-day trip, Jobs lectured computer science students in the Soviet Union, attended a July Fourth party at the American embassy, discussed opening a Mac factory in Russia, and almost ran afoul of the KGB by praising assassinated Marxist revolutionary Leon Trotsky.

What is Apple’s most important invention? [Friday Night Fights]

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What's your pick?
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

Now that all the excitement we had for WWDC has died down, it’s probably time we took a break from iOS 10, macOS Sierra, and all the other things you haven’t been able to avoid over the past couple of weeks. So for this week’s Friday Night Fight, we’re looking at Apple’s history.

We’re focusing on which product has been Apple’s most important throughout the years. Was it the Macintosh that changed personal computing? The iPod that put thousands of songs in your pocket? The iPhone that revolutionized mobile devices?

Join us as we battle it out over Apple’s best ever releases — and which one was most significant!