Is Apple ashamed of the iPhone 6’s protruding camera lens?

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Why is Apple hiding the bump of the iPhone 6 camera lens in profile?

The iPhone 6 is the first iPhone with a camera lens that protrudes slightly instead of being flush with the back of the device. It was a necessary design trade-off, allowing Jony Ive’s team of designers to cram the advanced optics into the iPhone 6 necessary to make it the best smartphone camera ever.

But that doesn’t change the fact that Apple usually likes clean lines in its product designs. And that protruding camera lens, when viewing the iPhone 6 in profile, turns an otherwise clean line into an unsightly bulge. Apple can’t stand that bulge, so the company is going to the unprecedented length of using clever lighting and photography to hide it in its marketing materials.

Fascinating photo blog dives into The New York Times’ morgue

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Sister Marie Chantal, left, kicks at an instructor during a Tae Kwon Do class in January 1994. Jack Manning/The New York Times

John Hills conducts an exercise class for people over 65 in January 1969. The published captions read: "Who says physical fitness is only for youngsters. Counting, with exaggerated enunciation, against pressure of fingers helps excercise the face and rest the body halfway through the hour-long session." Patrick A. Burns/The New York Times

Sgt. Richard Richards of the 86th Precinct demonstrates his shooting stance for a photographer during a police revolver competition in March of 1958. Ernie Sisto/The New York Times

Heavily armed Indochinese Communist soldiers, including women and young boys, occupy the city of Phnom Penh on May 4, 1975, marking the end of five years of war in Cambodia. At first the mood of the city was jubilant with the rebels being welcomed. Dith Pran/The New York Times

President Dwight D. Eisenhower at his Gettysburg farm walking around the grounds chatting with reporters and photographers in January 1955. George Tames/The New York Times

Umpire Durwood Merrill ejects Seattle Mariners manager Chuck Cottier during a 1985 game at Yankee Stadium. After arguing nose-to-nose with Merrill for several minutes, Cottier yanked first base out of the ground and heaved it into right field. Vic DeLucia/The New York Times

Giacomo Lauri-Volpi poses as Pollione from "Norma" in which he sang at the Metropolitan Opera in November 1927. The New York Times.

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A contact sheet of a skark swimming at an aquarium, May 1960. Sam Falk/The New York Times

A New York fire inspires a fantastic coiled pattern of hoses. Sam Falk/The New York Times

A man-made anchor holds down a plane at La Guardia Field in February, 1940. The New York Times.

An eight-story inflatable King Kong deflated on top of the Empire State Building after it developed a hole in its shoulder. The balloon ape was tethered to the skyscraper in April 1983 to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the King Kong movie. Sara Krulwich/The New York Times

Inside a New York City morgue, the rich, famous and celebrated rest in the same space with the soldier, the wheat farmer and nuns trained in the martial arts. There’s even a car show model who was mauled by a lion.

Darcy Eveleigh pulls drawers at random and gives these people another day. They’re not dead, just filed.

Eveleigh is a New York Times picture editor who curates the popular Tumblr blog, The Lively Morgue, a collection of historic and often quirky images found in the Times’ photo archive.

Eveleigh will not live to see every photo. The files are believed to hold between 10 and 20 million images. The site reports that if Times picture editors posted 10 new archived photos on the blog each day, they might have every picture online by the year 3935.

“They are all accidental small treasures I did not mean to come across,” Eveleigh said of the serendipity she relies on during her regular visits to the morgue, located three stories below ground level.

New Sony Ad, Press Images For QX100 & QX10 Attachable Lenses Leaked [Video]

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At an event in Berlin in just under two hours time, Sony will announce two attachable lenses that you’ll be able to stick onto the back of your smartphone to take better photos. They’re called the QX100 and the QX10, and you can see exactly what they’ll look like in the leaked press images above — and exactly how they’ll work in the leaked TV ad below.

Take Closeup iPhone 5 Photos With This Pair of Carson LensMag Macro Lenses

Microscope-like macro lenses are super neat — and not just because they let you see the little hairs on a ladybug’s leg. No, macro lenses can show you a whole new world. Or macro lenses can spark (or rekindle) a love affair with photography. Heck, at the very least, they’re good for hours of amusement.

There’s no shortage of macro lenses for the iPhone: There’s the high-end Olloclip, which also comes with a fisheye and a wide-angle lens; then there’s also this rubber-band macro from Photojojo, and these magnetic specimens.

Add to the list the new Carson ML-515 LensMag, a pair of iPhone macro lenses that clip magnetically onto the iPhone 5 — pretty standard fare. Only there is something different.