WWDC 2016 preview, Ken Segall talks to Kahney’s Korner podcast, best iPhone 6/6s cases out there, and more

The Worldwide Developers Conference 2016 promises to be huge.
The Worldwide Developers Conference 2016 promises to be huge.
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

Get ready for next week’s Worldwide Developers Conference 2016! We give you a sneak peek of what to expect in Apple’s keynote on Monday in San Francisco. Plus, teenager earns scholarship to WWDC by creating his own news app.

Listen to former Apple ad man Ken Segall — who put the “i” in iMac — discuss what he learned in 12 years working with Steve Jobs on Cult of Mac’s brand-new podcast Kahney’s Korner.

All this, and much much more, in Cult of Mac Magazine, free for you right now.

Here are this week’s top stories.

Ex-Apple ad man Ken Segall talks Apple and simplicity [Podcast interview]

Author Ken Segall worked in advertising with Steve Jobs for more than a dozen years. His new book is called Think Simple.
Author Ken Segall worked in advertising with Steve Jobs for more than a dozen years. His new book is called Think Simple.
Photo: Doug Schneider Photography

Ken Segall is a former Apple ad man who worked closely with Steve Jobs for more than a dozen years. Segall is the guy who put the “i” in iMac and worked on the famous “Think Different” campaign.

The big lesson he learned from Steve Jobs was keeping things simple. But easier said than done. How exactly do you keep things simple?

Segall went out and found 40 business folks who keep things straightforward. His new book based on those interviews is called Think Simple:How Smart Leaders Defeat Complexity.

In a new podcast, Kahney’s Korner, Segall talks about some of those lessons, how Steve Jobs kept things uncomplicated and about how Apple is doing these days without him.

This episode of Kahney’s Korner is supported by TunnelBear, an award-winning service that gives you fast and private access to the internet.

The guy who named iMac says Apple’s names are too confusing

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The next iPhone will have a bigger battery.
Is it time for Apple to change the way it names iPhones?
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

Former Apple marketing guru Ken Segall helped launched Apple’s string of i-devices, but now he says that the company has lost its way from simplicity lately and there’s no clearer sign than the confusing naming scheme of the iPhone.

In a recent op-ed claiming Apple’s days of simplicity may have died with his buddy Steve Jobs, Segall takes Apple’s product names to tasks for being far too complex for customers to keep track, saying Tim Cook has created products that he finds bewildering.

How Steve Jobs prepared Apple for controversies like Bendgate

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"You like me, you really like me!" Photo: Ben Stanfield/Flickr CC

The infamous iPhone 6 “bending video” may have reached close to 47 million hits on YouTube, but Apple has seemingly escaped Bendgate without any lasting damage — just as it has with every “gate” incident before it.

In a new blog post entitled “The Joy of Apple Slamming,” former Apple ad exec Ken Segall (the man who named the iMac) explains how Jobs created a company able to withstand the kind of damaging rumors that would permanently damage lesser rivals.

The secret? Get people to really, really love you.

Why Apple might kill the “i” forever

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Double down indeed. Not one glimpse of the Apple Watch was leaked to the press or even Chinese manufacturers ahead of this week. No one got the name of Apple Pay right. And who could have predicted the Digital Crown as the UI input for smartwatches? Say what you will about the new products, but Steve's secrecy machine is on point like never before.
Has Apple made the right choice to ditch the i-naming scheme for new products? The man who named the iMac thinks so. (Photo: Business Insider)

From books to phones, Apple’s named everything with the same “i” moniker since 1998. With the Apple Watch and Apple Pay, however, it looks like that convention is set to change. 

Cult of Mac reached out to Ken Segall — the former Apple employee who started the tradition with the original iMac — for his surprising reaction to Apple ditching his naming convention for new product categories.