Give your retina MacBook the stylish cable manager it deserves

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Easily store and travel with your 12-inch MacBook's power adapter and USB-C charging cord.
Photo: Above the Fray

Despite launching a few months ago, the new MacBook hasn’t gotten a tremendous amount of love from accessory makers so far. Above the Fray, a company based in Thailand, noticed a glaring omission for a 12-inch MacBook cable manager so the team took it upon themselves to create one.

Cusby adapters give you the building blocks to adjust to USB-C

Cusby adapters  allow you to plug into the new MacBook with a single USB-C port.
Cusby adapters allow you to plug into the new MacBook with a single USB-C port.
Photo: Cusby

You can’t stop staring at the new 12-inch MacBook, especially the gold one. It’s lighter and smaller and while it has all the computing power of your suddenly-bulkier model, you’re not sure about life with a single USB-C port.

A Miami startup, led by an electrical engineer, has designed adapters that will allow you to plug in all your peripherals and then gradually cut back as you move to a more wireless future.

The Cusby Building Blocks plug into a USB-C port with each offering a more traditional plug-in, like the current standard USB-A port, another with an HDMI video-audio port or another with an extra USB-C port.

Gadget lets you hear music without wrecking your ears

The Aumeo audio device, right, boosts clarity of sound so that your don't risk hearing loss by increased volume.
The Aumeo audio device, right, boosts clarity of sound so that your don't risk hearing loss by increased volume.
Photo: Aumeo

The best Beats headphones can’t help you if your ears are unable to hear certain subtle sounds. You can crank up the volume, but that only puts your hearing in peril.

The creators of Aumeo want to change the way you listen to music with an audio device that profiles your hearing – testing it with a smartphone app to find the frequency suited for each level – and offers sound-rich audio that lets you take your thumb off the volume button.

A person’s hearing is as unique as their fingerprints, but electronic audio devices provide more of a “one-size-fits-all” range of volume, according to Aumeo co-founder Paul Lee.

Couchlet turns any sofa or bed into a charging station

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The Couchlet nestles between cushions or under a mattress to make for a more comfortable reach of your phone when charging. Photo: Trident Designs
The Couchlet nestles between cushions or under a mattress to make for a more comfortable reach of your phone when charging. Photo: Trident Design

Chris Hawker does his best thinking when he sees someone doing something awkward. Watching people struggle with everyday tools guides the designer to invent things that solve everyday problems, from peeling a cucumber to powering our growing number of electronic devices.

So when Hawker found himself in an uncomfortable stretch between his couch and the nearest outlet, trying to charge his phone and talk on it at the same time, he wished for a plug-in near his leg.

Hawker came up with Couchlet, a thin, dual-USB port that tucks in between couch cushions or wedges beneath a mattress. On Indiegogo for just three days, the Couchlet attracted more than 1,600 funders and surpassed a $30,000 goal.

Go down with the ship: Titanic game goes deep on history

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Titanic: Honor and Glory is a game under development that would take players through the full five days of the luxury liners tragic journey. Photo: Four Funnels Entertainment
The Titanic: Honor and Glory game would take players through the full five days of the luxury liner's tragic journey. Photo: Four Funnels Entertainment

Video games let us experience murderous rampages, violent carjackings and the horrors of war. But should virtual entertainment take us through a real-life tragedy with depictions of the actual people who lost their lives?

The developers of Titanic: Honor and Glory are prepared to answer that question as they build out a game based on the 1912 sinking of the luxury liner that claimed more than 1,500 lives.