How to get rid of old iCloud backups on your iPhone

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Clean up iCloud to make room for bigger backups.
Clean up iCloud to make room for bigger backups.
Photo: Rob LeFebvre/Cult of Mac

If you’ve been using iCloud to back up your iOS devices for a while like I have, chances are you’ve got a few older backup files crufting up your iCloud storage space.

If you want to maximize the space on your iCloud account, you might want to delete some of these older iCloud backups to make room for more.

Here’s how to do that.

Master web notifications in Safari and Chrome

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The world wide web would like you to pay attention.
The World Wide Web would like you to pay attention.
Photo: Apple

Websites these days have another tool to engage you: the desktop notification. Many sites, this one included, allow you to opt in to a system of popup notices that encourage you to click through and see new content.

Of course, not all content is created equal, and you might someday wish to stop being notified of new cat photos from that feline-friendly website.

Here’s how to manage web notifications using two of the Mac’s most popular web browsers, Safari and Chrome.

How to keep your Apple Watch Glances quick

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Sorry, but you can't get rid of this Glance.
Sorry, but you can't get rid of this Glance.
Photo: Rob LeFebvre/Cult of Mac

Most every app I’ve installed on my Apple Watch brings some sort of Glance along with it. While that’s a neato-keen thing to put in your App description to sell more apps, I’m not convinced that every app I have needs to be on my wrist.

Nuzzle, Words with Friends, Tile, Fandango, Foursquare: These are all apps I surely do not need or want on my Apple Watch.

Here’s how to clean up your Apple Watch Glances section for a much more focused and clear informational workflow. Because seriously, how many swipes do I need to get to the battery Glance?

How to avoid fake iOS crash scam that wants to steal your cash

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Give us your money, or the iPhone gets it!
Give us your money, or the iPhone gets it!
Photo: Cult of Mac

An iOS scam designed to cheat people out of money is being reported by users in both the United States and the U.K.

A number of iPhone and iPad users have received pop-up notifications on their devices informing them that iOS has crashed, that their personal data is being stolen by a third party, and that the only way to solve the problem is (surprise!) to pay between $19 and $80 for a fix.

Sounds legit. Where do we send our money?