Apple wants to get HomeKit into houses before they’re built


Apple announced HomeKit to developers at WWDC last year.
HomeKit-compatible devices are being built into new-builds.
Photo: Apple

In an effort to beat rivals like Google into people’s homes, Apple is reportedly working with building firms to incorporate HomeKit-compatible technologies into houses as they’re being built.

“We want to bring home automation to the mainstream,” Greg Joswiak, Apple’s vice president of product marketing, told Bloomberg. “The best place to start is at the beginning, when a house is just being created.”

Apple gives hackers a behind the scenes look at iOS security


iOS 10
Here's how Apple keeps iPhone data locked right.
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

Apple gave hackers an inside look at how it keeps iOS 10 secure during a recent Black Hat conference keynote that has now been made available to view online. 

The keynote by Apple security expert Ivan Krstic discusses three iOS security mechanisms (HomeKit, Auto Unlock and iCloud Keychain) in unprecedented detail, showing key elements of Apple’s cryptographic design. If you’ve ever been curious how Apple keeps all your private data safe, it’s well worth watching. 

Check it out below:

Eve Energy smart switch lets you manage your home’s energy use effortlessly


Eve Energy offers easy tools for controlling and monitoring home electricity use.
Eve Energy offers easy tools for controlling and monitoring home electricity use.
Photo: Elgato

Apple’s ‘privacy czars’ stop devs from getting their hands on your data


Apple FBI encryption
Apple takes privacy pretty darn seriously.
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

Are you a third-party dev, advertiser, or Apple employee hoping to use targeted ads or personalized recommenders based on Apple customer data? There’s an app for that. Good luck with that!

That’s according to a new report, which states that Apple has an internal committee consisting of three expert “privacy czars,” who have have to sign off on any and all collection of Apple user data.

And if you thought the App Store review process could drag on, you’ve got another thing coming: debates over individual uses of data at Apple can, in some cases, continue for upwards of one year.