Western Digital’s new USB-C hard drive can also charge MacBooks

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The G-Drive packs 45 watts of charging power.
The G-Drive packs 45 watts of charging power.
Photo: Western Digital

Owners of the new MacBook Pro with USB-C can now connect an external hard drive and get their charge on at the same time.

The folks at Western Digital introduced the new G-Drive USB-C external hard drive today, which combines up to 10TB of hard disk storage with 45 watts of charging power so MacBook owners have fewer dongles and cables to worry about.

Streamline and safeguard your Mac’s hard drive with Drive Genius 4 at 50% off [Deals]

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Drive Genius 4 is the leading app for maintaining, repairing and protecting your Mac's hard drive.
Drive Genius 4 is the leading app for maintaining, repairing and protecting your Mac's hard drive.

We trust our Macs to be solid and reliable, but what if there’s a problem lurking under its silvery hood? Drive Genius is an award-winning app that leads the market in maintaining, optimizing, preventing and even reversing problems in your computer’s main brain, it’s hard drive. Right now you can get peace of mind and peak performance from your Mac with Drive Genius 4 for $49.99 at Cult of Mac Deals.

Which massive hard drives are too big to fail?

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Looking for a new hard drive? Stay away from 3TB units. Photo: Backblaze Media

One year ago we were given some insight into which hard drives last the longest thanks to Backblaze media’s analysis of the tens of thousands of hard drives in their data center. The company uses regular consumer-grade hard drives due to the cheaper costs to power their unlimited storage offerings for customers, and this year they’re back with a new study revealing which 4TB hard drives are too big to fail.

After spinning 41,213 disk drives in its data center, Backblaze crunched the numbers at the end of 2014 to find that if want a hard drive with the lowest failure rate possible, go with an HGST drive.

Fix Your Damaged Drive And Recover Your Lost Files At The Data Rescue Center [Sponsored Post]

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TDRC

Visualize Your Hard Drive Space With GrandPerspective [OS X Tips]

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grand perspective

When you’re running a Macbook Air or Pro with an SSD in it, you’re probably concerned about space on your drive. You can easily sort files in the Finder by size to see what you might want to delete or at least put on an external drive, but sometimes it’s nicer to visualize your data in a different way.

That’s where apps like GrandPerspective come in. This one is simple to use, works well, and is entirely free. It helps you see your data as an image, and then you can decide what to do with your files from there.

How To Repair & Verify Your Hard Drive From The Command Line [OS X Tips]

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verify volume

OS X offers a very nice graphical user interface to verify and repair your hard drive, located in the Utilities folder. It’s called Disk Utility, and you can use it as the first line of defense when weird disk-related things happen to your Mac’s hard drive.

If, however, you want to dig in a bit deeper, or you’re already running Terminal a lot and don’t want to launch a separate app, you can use the following commands to both verify (check for problems) and repair any problems that you might find when verifying.

Use A Different Hard Drive To Startup Your Mac With These Keyboard Tips [OS X Tips]

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Starting up your Mac each day may seem a simple thing, right? Just press the power key on your keyboard or main Mac unit, hear the Mac chime, and then get to work, right?

Sometimes, though, you might want to boot a Windows partition with Boot Camp, or start up from a network volume. Heck, you might even want to start from a completely different OS X disk.

In that case, use the following keyboard shortcuts to do so.

Save Space On Your Hard Drive – Delete System Logs And QuickLook Cache Files [OS X Tips]

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QuickLook and System Logs

There are many files that help make your system usable, but they can build up over time. System logs, for example, keep track of usage, errors, and services running on your Mac, but unless you look at these often via an app like Console, you’ll probably not need a ton of log files taking up space on your Mac, especially if you have one with a low-volume SSD.

QuickLook cache files make your Mac feel zippy when you hit the spacebar to preview files in the Finder or Open/Save dialogs. If you can stand a bit of a wait to do this, deleting these files can save you some space as well.

Put together, you might save a decent amount of space on your hard drive, so give it a shot. Here’s how.