Hacker Demonstrates Ability To Remotely Hijack An Airplane Using A Smartphone


You can get some pretty cool gadgets that can be remote controlled by your smartphones and tablets, such as helicopters, cars, and even tanks. But who wants one of those when you can control the real think?

At the Hack in the Box security conference in Amsterdam this week, Hugo Teso, a pilot turned IT technician, demonstrated the ability to remotely hijack an airplane using a smartphone and a radio transmitter.

iOS Hacker Pod2g Releases PodDJ, His First iOS App [Video]



pod2g, an iOS hacker famous for his many jailbreaks, most recently the Absinth 2.0 release for devices running iOS 5.1.1, has released today released his first iOS app. It’s called podDJ, and it turns your iPad into “the most realistic virtual turntable you have ever seen,” allowing you to mix and scratch any track in your iTunes library.

Jailbreak Brings Mac OS (And Hope) To Microsoft Surface RT Tablet



If you’re a Mac user who picked up a Microsoft Surface RT tablet out of curiosity when they went on sale last October, and you’re yet to find a use for it, then don’t despair. Earlier this week it was revealed that it’s possible to jailbreak the device and install desktop apps that are designed for ARM processors — something Microsoft doesn’t officially support.

One developer has taken advantage of the exploit to run an early version of Apple’s Mac OS operating system inside a emulator.

Developer Uses Siri To Control Phillips Hue Lights


Check this video out – it’s a developer who’s used a Siri development plugin to control his Phillips Hue IP-controllable light bulbs. While the video is short, the guy who did it, Brandon Evans, has posted the code and instructions needed to make it happen on your own iPad, assuming you know what he’s talking about.

Evan has this to say about the project:

The Philips Hue hardware was first intriguing to me because they explicitly mention that it’s a ZigBee certified product on the packaging and labels. ZigBee is a wireless technology that is different from WiFi in a few important ways: Low power, equivalent range and intended for light data mesh networks. It’s popular with DIY hardware makers (think Arduinos) for this reason, as well as that it’s much cheaper than WiFi modules. It seems like it may be the wireless standards of choice for consumer home automation systems that are coming to market. As an example, the Nest thermostat was also found to have ZigBee hardware inside, although it isn’t supported in software yet. Because of all this I wanted to see exactly what hardware Philips was using, and if it would be possible to replicate the Hue system.

Looks like a great first step to using off-the-shelf technology to control home systems. Bravo, Mr. Evans!

Source: Brandon Evans
Via: Loop Insight