Greenpeace thinks everyone should be more like Apple

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Apple is spreading its green initiative to China. Photo: Apple
Apple has been praised by Greenpeace for its proactive role in leading the sustainability drive. Samsung? Not so much.

Considering that just a few short years ago Apple was scoring dead last on Greenpeace’s report on green-friendly data centres, the company has made amazing strides in order to turn around its reputation.

In a new September report from Greenpeace, entitled “Green Gadgets: Designing the Future,” the global environmental organization says that Apple is doing more than any other manufacturer to reduce the damage it does to the environment. The report notes that Apple has kept its promise to eliminate use of hazardous materials including Polyvinylchloride (PVC) and Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) in its products.

Apple Ranks 4th In EPA’s 30 Greenest Tech Companies List

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Mirror mirror on the wall, who is the greenest tech company of them all? Not Apple, at least according to the Environmental Protection Agency’s list of the Top 30 tech and Telecom companies that run on green power. But they weren’t far from the top.

According to the EPA’s ranking, Intel is the greenest tech company there is, having used over 3 billion kWh of green power in 2013. Next up, Microsoft, who took second place at just under 2 billion kWh. Google came in third with a distant 737 million kWH, and Apple came up in fourth place with 537 million kWH.

There is a consolation prize for Apple, though. While they may only be fourth greenest company in the EPA’s eyes, they did at least source more providers for that power than any other company on the list.

Via: BGR

Tree-hugger Audiophiles Take Note: Thinksound Debuts Their First Wooden Cans, The On1

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All of Thinksound’s earphones encompass three basic principles: They’re made of wood; they’re given the sort of pro-green marketing and manufacturing attention that would satisfy even the most spirited hippy; and they offer big, warm sound for a relatively small price.

But aside from its requisite earthy wooden elements and green cred, Thinksound’s new supra-aural On1 studio monitors is taking the small company into uncharted territory.

Eton’s New Monster-Sized Rukus XL Boombox Turns Sunlight into Music

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Look, I’m no hippy; but there’s definitely something magical and awesome about the idea of transforming sunlight into music (really, I’m not a hippy — I don’t even know what patchouli oil smells like). And just like Eton’s other solar-powered Bluetooth speakers, that’s exactly what the new $200 Bluetooth-equipped Rukus XL does. Only in a bigger, badder, louder way.